Micawber


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Synonyms for Micawber

fictional character created by Charles Dickens

References in classic literature ?
Micawber, 'I make no stranger of you, and therefore do not hesitate to say that Mr.
Micawber. 'Six tea, two salt, and a pair of sugars, I have at different times borrowed money on, in secret, with my own hands.
Micawber now, and begged her to make use of me to any extent.
Micawber had a few books on a little chiffonier, which he called the library; and those went first.
Micawber's difficulties came to a crisis, and he was arrested early one morning, and carried over to the King's Bench Prison in the Borough.
Micawber was waiting for me within the gate, and we went up to his room (top story but one), and cried very much.
Micawber, came in from the bakehouse with the loin of mutton which was our joint-stock repast.
Micawber. There was a very dirty lady in his little room, and two wan girls, his daughters, with shock heads of hair.
Micawber, the children, the Orfling, and myself; and lived in those rooms night and day.
Micawber's cares; for some relatives or friends had engaged to help them at their present pass, and they lived more comfortably in the prison than they had lived for a long while out of it.
Micawber's affairs, although past their crisis, were very much involved by reason of a certain 'Deed', of which I used to hear a great deal, and which I suppose, now, to have been some former composition with his creditors, though I was so far from being clear about it then, that I am conscious of having confounded it with those demoniacal parchments which are held to have, once upon a time, obtained to a great extent in Germany.
Micawber, who was present, 'I have no doubt I shall, please Heaven, begin to be beforehand with the world, and to live in a perfectly new manner, if - in short, if anything turns up.'
Micawber, about this time, composed a petition to the House of Commons, praying for an alteration in the law of imprisonment for debt.
Micawber in front of the petition, while my old friend Captain Hopkins (who had washed himself, to do honour to so solemn an occasion) stationed himself close to it, to read it to all who were unacquainted with its contents.
In which novel by Charles Dickens does Mr Micawber appear?