Mercator's projection


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Related to Mercator's projection: Mercator chart
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Synonyms for Mercator's projection

a map projection of the earth onto a cylinder

References in periodicals archive ?
Mercator's projection, for example, was not in general use by the mid-sixteenth century and Frobisher's voyages were important precursors to James, but almost missed in the narrative.
Mariners benefited most from Mercator's projection, which allowed for easy navigation of the high seas with thumb lines (clear-cut routes with a constant compass bearing) for true direction.
Mercator's Projection, as it was called, revolutionized navigation and science in the late 1500s and endures today.
Freedom, for Hanson, is defined by a particularly expansive reading of Mercator's projection. It's a Western value; wherever it can be found, then, that's the West: "Throughout this book I use the term 'Western' to refer to the culture of classical antiquity that arose in Greece and Rome; survived the collapse of the Roman Empire; spread to western and northern Europe; then during the great periods of exploration and colonization of the fifteenth through nineteenth centuries expanded to the Americas, Australia, and areas of Asia and Africa; and now exercises global political, economic, cultural, and military power far greater than the size of its territory or population might otherwise suggest."
Mercator's projection, devised as a navigational aid in the 16th century, showed lines of longitude as straight vertical lines, equidistant apart at all latitudes, with horizontal distances stretched above and below the Equator; exaggerated near the Poles.