Mandaean

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Synonyms for Mandaean

a member of a small Gnostic sect that originated in Jordan and survives in Iraq and who believes that John the Baptist was the Messiah

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the form of Aramaic used by the Mandeans

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of or relating to the Mandaean people or their language or culture

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References in periodicals archive ?
Norres was one of a group of 23 Mandeans who, in October 2001, boarded a boat to Australia which came to be known as SIEV X.
Further, over time the different religious groups organized places where they could gather; the Shia now had a mosque, and the Mandeans had their own place.
S., The Mandeans of Iraq and Iran, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1937.
It does so by explicitly extending its protection to all religious believers, including "Christians, Yazidis, [and] Sabaean Mandeans," (217) by forbidding the establishment of parties that advocate takfir (the practice of declaring someone an infidel), (218) and by ensuring that believers are free not only to assert but also to practice their faiths.
Some contemporary authors, such as Clive Prince and Lynn Picknett in The Templar Revelation, even assert Mary Magdalene was probably a priestess of the Egyptian goddess Isis and a member of a still-existing sect known as the Mandeans, now located in Iraq, who believe John the Baptist to be the true Messiah.
Also called Mandeans, they are the lone remnant of Gnosticism, a competitor to early Christianity fought by the church as a heresy.
The following lamentation from the Mandeans illustrates the basic beliefs of a whole series of so-called Gnostic cults, which spread across the Mediterranean basin around the time of the emergence of Christianity:
The Mandeans (many of whom are thought to have converted, some to Islam, some to Christianity, to save their lives) then declared they were Sabians, following the advice, as some Arab historians report, of a doctor of Muslim law.(58) And to strengthen their new claim these people, who were also Babylonian, appealed to the authority of John the Baptist, who was in any case a figure dear to Islam.
The settling of old scores was inevitable and was followed by the little reported persecution of minority religious groups, such as Christians and Mandeans (the latter ancient tradition now facing extinction), by religious extremists.
The Mandean religion forbids them to carry guns or engage in any form of violence, making them particularly vulnerable.
Although this is not the place to explore such connections in detail, it is worth noting that in both the early Islamic and Mandean traditions Mary appears as a strongly anti-Jewish figure, at least on occasion.(106) In both of these traditions, as in the Christian tradition, the main issue is the Jewish sexual "slander" of the Virgin, an issue which serves to distinguish all three of these religious traditions from their Jewish source.