mid

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used in combination to denote the middle

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References in periodicals archive ?
In this study, the researchers collected 100 MIDI files in four genres: classical, blues, rock, and pop.
The MIDI file was then converted into an AIFF file using QuickTime Pro.
As a single volume with more than 3,000 hymn lyrics, more than 2,400 hymn melodies and four-voice arrangements rendered as MIDI files, and links from hymn lyrics to Biblical sources, this is a solid resource with enormous "CD-ROMness." It would require close to a hundred CDs to render 2,400 hymns as sound recordings; 3,000 lyrics would require a thick volume; and neither of those would offer the links available on this disc.
Pedagogical applications of Themefinder will not be explored here in detail, but it is worth highlighting the Haydn/Mozart String Quartet Quiz as one manifestation of Themefinder's capabilities beyond naming "that tune." Alter providing some personal information regarding his or her musical background and training, a user may listen to a MIDI file of an extended theme taken from either a Mozart, or Haydn string quartet.
One may import any MIDI file for practice; built-in selections are from Billy Joel, Elton John, James Taylor, Paul McCartney and more.
The companion CD (also available as a MIDI file download) features an authentic rhythm section (bass and drums) with guitar and organ added on some tracks.
If the composer works in later versions of finale or Sibelius, then a clean pdf of the score and a good midi file can be submitted.
The user can access the MIDI file, if available, or the translation or text.
The Cyber Hymnal takes you to an information page with a picture of John Newton; a link to his biography, with cross-referenced links to other songs he has composed; links to the MIDI file and score; seven verses of text; links to the text in other languages, including Cherokee and Navajo; background information; and the scripture reference.
The standalone ARIA Player allows anyone to load and play back MIDI files and produce audio recordings of the MIDI file or live performances, without additional software.
It has the usual features one now expects in music notation software: input via MIDI, mouse, or computer keyboard; MIDI file import and export; WYSIWYG editing with the mouse or keyboard; sophisticated MIDI playback with the interpretation of most expression marks; engraver-quality fonts and printing; and the ability to handle almost any music notation, from Gregorian chant to John Cage, including Philip de Vitry, Duke Ellington, and Elton John.
To illustrate, the popular Video Game Music Archive (vgmusic.com) offers links to thousands of MIDI files. After downloading the game song of choice, a teacher could import that MIDI file into notation software, perhaps using cloud-computing (Internet-based) software like Noteflight (noteflight.com), and then edit it according a student's abilities.
The backing tracks in the MIDI file play all the hard parts of the piece and create an overall sound that is familiar, much like what your students expect to hear at a Broadway show, symphony concert or big-band performance.
Let's say that you have a MIDI file or a generic audio file, such as an MP3.