lumpsucker

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Words related to lumpsucker

any of several very small lumpfishes

References in periodicals archive ?
Lumpsuckers get their name from specially adapted pelvic fins on their bellies which form a suction cup.
He landed 30 lumpsucker fish and handed them over Tynemouth's Blue Reef Aquarium.
A LUMPSUCKER was last night getting used to life in an aquarium after narrowly escaping the nets of a North Wales mussel trawler.
One of Britain's more unusual fish, the lumpsucker usually lives in deep water offshore.
Frankie Hobro of the Sea Zoo said yesterday: "This particular lumpsucker hadbeen dredged upby the trawler and travelled throughout the length of the conveyor belt system, out of water, before being dumped face down in a large tub of mussels.
The lumpsucker is one of the most bizarre fish in Britain.
After being taken to the Anglesey Sea Zoo the lumpsucker appeared surprisingly healthy, weighing in at an impressive 3.
There is still doubt as to whether the eggs will be viable, and unfortunately this seems unlikely because so little is known about lumpsucker reproduction," said Frankie.
The commonest species in British waters is the shore clingfish or Cornish lumpsucker.
But thousands of little lumpsuckers - Cyclopterus lumpus - hatched out and are now being cared for at the Weymouth Sea Life Centre in Dorset.
Lumpsuckers are unusual because they have a sucker on their chest which they use to attach themselves to rocks.
Thousands of young were produced after Lawrie the lumpsucker was despatched from Oban to Bournemouth for his blind date.
He was the only male lumpsucker in Britain at the time and his mate's eggs would have been eaten, because they are used as a cheap alternative to Beluga caviar, if he hadn't arrived.
We are lucky that there was a male lumpsucker available - even if he did have to endure a 600- mile journey.
Of the lumpsucker fish, Frankie said: "They're around UK waters for six months every year and no one knows where they go for the next six months.