Luftwaffe


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  • noun

Synonyms for Luftwaffe

the German airforce

References in periodicals archive ?
We all know how robust Luftwaffe aircraft were at the beginning of the Second World War.
The Army experts removed what they identified as a World War II Luftwaffe incendiary, and took it away for safe disposal.
Subsequent adjustments gave the Luftwaffe five weeks, running from 8 August to 15 September, to win hegemony over English skies.
You never broke our spirits with your Luftwaffe raids.
That's where the Luftwaffe aerial photographs enter the picture, Carmel said.
It is this resuscitation of the wolf packs that Robert Forsyth covers in his new book "Shadow Over the Atlantic, the Luftwaffe and the U-Boats: 1943-45."
At this stage of the war, some degree of complacency may have developed among Allied aircrews regarding the Luftwaffe's ability to mount any meaningful opposition.
Luftwaffe in Colour: From Glory to Defeat 1942-1945 is a full-color photographic showcase of the planes and the men who composed the Luftwaffe (the air force of Germany during World War II).
It describes the efforts of the Royal Air Force (RAF) against the German Luftwaffe, focusing on the strategies of circus operations and fighter sweeps.
The November 19 attack marked the first large scale aerial raid on Birmingham as part of a campaign by the German Luftwaffe to break the Brummie spirit.
The north-east fishing port of Peterhead was the second most bombed place in Britain after London, according to author Les Taylor in his book Luftwaffe Over Scotland.
To the north, the Inland Revenue and BBC Light Entertainment relocated from London to Bangor to escape heavy bombing but, situated on the Luftwaffe flight path to the Merseyside docks, Bangor received hits along with Llandudno and Holyhead.
Tragically, before the RAF finally defeated the Luftwaffe, only around half of the estimated crew of 3,000 survived.