lese majesty

(redirected from Lese majeste)
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  • noun

Synonyms for lese majesty

lack of proper respect

Synonyms for lese majesty

a crime that undermines the offender's government

References in periodicals archive ?
Human rights groups have accused the ruling military of applying the lese majeste law more widely since a 2014 military coup as a way to silence critics.
Sulak Sivaraksa was charged by police last October under the country's draconian lese majeste law that protects the monarchy from libel and defamation.
Jonathan Beckman, an award-winning nonfiction author, has written a lively, engaging narrative, making this pivotal case of a stolen necklace, mistaken identity, and the crime of lese majeste a dramatic tale of intrigue and suspense.
Criticism of the monarch, the regent or the heir, known by the French term lese majeste, is a crime that carries a jail sentence of up to 15 years in Thailand.
In Israel, that is close to lese majeste. Since the beginning of October, Israel has been experiencing a wave of violence that has not yet acquired an official name.
Bangkok, Muharram 12, 1437, Oct 25, 2015, SPA -- A Thai man facing lese majeste charges was found hanged in his cell at a military facility in Bangkok, the department of corrections said Sunday.
Speaking today (11 Aug) to reporters in Geneva, Human Rights Office spokesperson Ravina Shamdasani said, "We are appalled by the shockingly disproportionate prison terms handed down over the past few months in lese majeste cases in Thailand.
Interruption qu'il considererait comme lese majeste et comme un geste hostile a son etat d'enflure.
Thailand's lese majeste law is the world's harshest, carrying a punishment of three to 15 years in jail for anyone who defames, insults, or threatens the monarchy.
Johnson, mightily oended by this act of lese majeste got up and promptly kayoed Ketchel, brushing the challenger's teeth from his glove.
This is known as Lese Majeste and is punishable by a prison sentence of three to 15 years, and sometimes longer
The character of Calvin Candy (di Caprio) is a case in point: as a southern plantation-owner who has inherited a slave-owning mentality and lese majeste, di Caprio does a superb job of creating a character at once urbane, genteel, and amiable, whose attractive characteristics veil a reptilian ruthlessness and cruelty.
The simple truth is that some Scandinavian countries, along with Spain and the Netherlands, have something called lese majeste laws on the books.
Cambodia does not have strict lese majeste laws, except for a clause in the Constitution that says "the King shall be inviolable."
Protests in Egypt erupted against the Saudi diplomatic delegations after Saudi Arabia detained an Egyptian human rights activist under the pretext of violating majesty, also known as "Lese Majeste."