Karelian


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  • noun

Synonyms for Karelian

a member of the Finnish people living in Karelia in northwestern European Russia

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a Finnic language spoken by the people of Karelia

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References in periodicals archive ?
The petition, which has already gathered almost 1,000 signatures, reads: "The Department for the Economy is proposing to grant a licence to Karelian Diamond Resources to prospect for 'diamonds and base metals' across a huge area of Fermanagh and Tyrone.
Currently, Preparatory work is underway at the Institute of Linguistics, Literature and History of the Karelian Research Centre of the Russian Academy of Sciences for the publication of a separate Linguistic Atlas of the Veps Language.
Petersburg, the city sits at the extreme Western frontier of Russian territory on the eastern periphery of the Karelian Isthmus.
Kupari discusses the religion of Finnish Orthodox Christian women having evacuee Karelian backgrounds.
When the researchers looked at LPS signaling in the Russian Karelian microbiome, they saw a familiar pattern: E.
The purchase price is EUR 150,000 (USD 169,980), comprising an initial purchase price of EUR 50,000 plus a further EUR 100,000 after twenty four months unless Karelian decides not to develop the project.
Among them were their expertise and tools for the timber industry, as well as their roles in developing Karelian theatre and music, including the introduction of jazz.
Another figure of note is Karelian birch, known also as Karelian burl and Masur birch.
Petersburg to which they belonged began to make the eastern areas of the Karelian Isthmus more suitable for their "little Russia" colonies by changing the domestic language, increasing the services of a local Russian-speaking administration, and diffusing the Tsarist educational and ecclesiastic systems.
It was in 1920, at the time of the Tartu peace negotiations, that the Karelian Workers' Commune was established within the new Soviet republic.
Also in the third section, Irma-Riitta Jarvinen tracks the early occurrences of St Anne in Finnish and Karelian religion and folklore, and the varied role she has played in cultural terms, with reflexes in folkloric performative customs, while Linda Kaljundi takes a contextual, sociological, and historiographical view of ritual and performance associated with the thirteenth-century Chronicle of Henry of Livonia.
The piece, which was originally commissioned by the Hilliard Ensemble, describes an episode in the life of Kullervo, the only irredeemably tragic character in The Kalevala, a 19th century work of Finnish epic poetry compiled from Finnish and Karelian oral folklore and mythology.