ransom

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Synonyms for ransom

buy the freedom of

Synonyms

Synonyms for ransom

money demanded for the return of a captured person

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payment for the release of someone

the act of freeing from captivity or punishment

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References in periodicals archive ?
John Crowe Ransom used the term, but not in a very specific sense," (12) I cannot find the phrase "close reading" anywhere in the book (they do not provide a quotation).
Critique: An extraordinary and long thought lost to history work of John Crowe Ransom's Depression-era treatise, "Land!: The Case for an Agrarian Economy" is a highly valued and unreservedly recommended addition to community and academic library Economic Studies collections and supplemental reading lists.
(84.) John Crowe Ransom, God Without Thunder (London: Gerald Howe Ltd., 1931), 67.
Letters between John Marshall and Flannery O'Connor and John Crowe Ransom. RG 1.2, Series 200 R, Box 359, Fld 3246.
The Southern Renaissance was in some senses introduced by writers such as William Faulkner, Caroline Gordon, Elizabeth Madox Roberts, Katherine Anne Porter, and Tennessee Williams, but it became focused in Nashville and Vanderbilt University, where prominent academics or former students such Robert Penn Warren, Donald Davidson, Allen Tate and John Crowe Ransom were at work.
The passenger, a guest in Gambier, Ohio, that day, was Robert Penn Warren, and his host was John Crowe Ransom. I was early by at least twenty minutes, and that was due not to inadvertance but to planning.
Much to our delight, Robert Penn Warren, Allen Tate, John Crowe Ransom, and Andrew Lytle were the speakers.
John Crowe Ransom's early and mid-career writings on gender as well as the nature of the aesthetic object are both intimated related and more complicated than critics previously have acknowledged.
Richards or John Crowe Ransom, for example, who doted on their preferred poems in amorous ways.
Why should so many of the poems of the principal two Southern Fugitives, Allen Tate and John Crowe Ransom, poems with titles such as "Pastoral", "Cold pastoral", "Eclogue of the liberal and the poet", "Idyl", and "Eclogue", show the survival of the old pastoral, a formal genre that died out in the seventeenth century?
In order to tease out this line of reasoning, he examines texts by writers as diverse as Hamlin Garland, Kate Chopin, Willa Cather, Edith Wharton, Ellen Glasgow, Claude McKay, and John Crowe Ransom, among others.
Plenty of widely-known figures are here, including John Crowe Ransom, Robert Penn Warren, Still, Randall Jarrell, Margaret Walker, James Dickey, Donald Justice, Ammons, Miller Williams, Wendell Berry, Chappell, Henry Taylor, and Nikki Giovanni.
One might say that Gass learned that an art object--such as a poem--can and should be analyzed and appreciated solely in itself, without consideration of the biographical details about or the intentions of its author, and that form is independent of content during his undergraduate years at Kenyon College where John Crowe Ransom professed the New Criticism.
This is especially true for his deep-seated attraction to the best Southern writers as well as for his high regard (despite a level of political skepticism) for New Critics such as John Crowe Ransom and Cleanth Brooks.
In The Anatomy of Nonsense (1943), Eliot, Wallace Stevens, and John Crowe Ransom are all prosecuted for their encouragement of emotional irresponsibility.