Jerry


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Synonyms for Jerry

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"Master" means to them, as "Mister" Haggin meant to Jerry, a deal more, and a great deal more, than it means to humans.
Now "God" was no word in Jerry's vocabulary, despite the fact that he already possessed a definite and fairly large vocabulary.
And so, when Mister Haggin, or God, or call it what one will with the limitations of language, picked Jerry up with imperative abruptness, tucked him under his arm, and stepped into the whaleboat, whose black crew immediately bent to the oars, Jerry was instantly and nervously aware that the unusual had begun to happen.
'Well, I seen pretty quick that Jerry thinks the world of Gentleman.
1, Easy Street." You see, Jerry Moore was one of these slow, simple fellers, and you could tell in a moment what a lot he thought of Gentleman.
'This here Jerry Moore was a simple sort of feller.
When the oat-spry horse had hedged a little his first spurt of speed Jerry broke the lid of his cab and called down through the aperture in the voice of a cracked megaphone, trying to please:
"'Tis drivin' for pleasure she is," thought Jerry. And then he suggested as a matter of course:
When they reached Fifty-ninth street Jerry's head was bobbing and his reins were slack.
The Irish terrier, under all circumstances amenable to the control of the master as are few breeds of dogs, was instantly manifest in Jerry and Michael an Harley Kennan's voice rang out.
As for Michael, he accepted, without surprise, the indubitable fact that Jerry had come back out of the Nothingness.
take my cab, my horse will get you there all right;" and as he shut them in, with a wink toward Jerry, said, "It's against his conscience to go beyond a jog-trot." Then slashing his jaded horse, he set off as hard as he could.
Although Jerry was determinedly set against hard driving, to please careless people, he always went a good fair pace, and was not against putting on the steam, as he said, if only he knew why.
"Why, to be sure!" exclaimed Jerry, recalling the Trial at which he had assisted.
Among the first of these volunteers was Jerry Cruncher himself, who modestly concealed his spiky head from the observation of Tellson's, in the further corner of the mourning coach.