Jean-Paul Sartre


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Related to Jean-Paul Sartre: Albert Camus, Sigmund Freud
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Synonyms for Jean-Paul Sartre

French writer and existentialist philosopher (1905-1980)

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Jean-Paul Sartre may be considered the prophet of French postmodernism, and Being and Nothingness may be viewed as the bible, or at least the Old Testament, of French postmodernism (the four gospels being written by Foucault, Deleuze, Derrida, and Lyotard).
In Plato's metaphor, philosophizing amounts to being on the hunt for the "Idea of Being." Insofar as Jean-Paul Sartre has recently attacked the Platonic world view in an extremely radical and, in its radicalism, revealing manner, we have, somewhat unexpectedly, been given the opportunity to bring the general contours of that world view into sharper relief.
Some of the famous poems had been engraved on the old wooden tables as a permanent mark by writers in the old times." The term Tantonville, as interviewees explained, means "the aunt's city." Owners also boast that they had hosted eminent singers and authors, namely Albert Camus, Jean-Paul Sartre and Charles Aznavour.
(3) Jean-Paul Sartre, "Huis Clos" in Huis Clos and Other Plays, London: Penguin Books, 2000, p.
The approach taken is based on the philosophical traditions of French phenomenology as represented by such figures as Jean-Paul Sartre, Maurice Merleau Ponty, and Paul Ricoeur, as well as on recent work rethinking Immanuel Kant, such as that done by Christine Korsgaard.
That was Jean-Paul Sartre's vision of hell in his existentialist drama "No Exit" ("Huis Clos"), which opens tonight in a student production and runs through Nov.
"Everything has been figured out, except how to live." Jean-Paul Sartre (1905 - 1980) was a French existentialist philosopher, playwright, novelist, screenwriter, political activist, biographer, and literary critic.
Daffy - Another Round WHEN an album starts with the line: "I've been misquoting Jean-Paul Sartre like some rock 'n' roll disaster" you know this isn't going to be an Oasis rip-off.
"LIBERTY is not the power to do what one wants, but the power to do what one can," so reads an inscription in the Statute of Liberty Museum attributed to Jean-Paul Sartre.
In interviews, Mr Sarkozy has started casually dropping references to heavyweight authors from Louis-Ferdinand Celine to Jean-Paul Sartre.
Christina Hoff Sommers ("Not Lost in Translation," Fall 2010) confesses to some residual affection for Simone de Beauvoir--despite the latter's affection for Soviet-style dictatorship, and abysmal subservience to the notoriously sexist Jean-Paul Sartre. These and other Beauvoirian habits and attitudes evoke little save sorrow and anger in me: sorrow that her feminism is an unreal evocation of an entirely abstract reality tethered to an altogether too real loathing of all things female, especially the female body; and anger that the upshot is little save contempt for the compromises of liberal democracy.
So, not wanting to sound too Jean-Paul Sartre, Big Pit's world-famous underground tour - 300 feet straight down - puts you into the boots of those who worked the coal face and helped Wales play a vital part in the Industrial Revolution.
"I am educated and I only know The Nausea by Jean-Paul Sartre, a philosopher, a Nobel Prize winner, but also a great football fan."