Italian


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References in classic literature ?
Charley came forward to board the prize, but when I proceeded to haul alongside by means of the line, the Italians cast it off.
I've always heard that Greeks don't like Italians," Charley laughed, as he ran aft to the tiller.
Therefore it is necessary to be prepared with such arms, so that you can be defended against foreigners by Italian valour.
I had already a slight general notion of Italian letters from Leigh Hunt, and from other agreeable English Italianates; and I knew that I wanted to read not only the four great poets, Dante, Petrarch, Ariosto, and Tasso, but that whole group of burlesque poets, Pulci, Berni, and the rest, who, from what I knew of them, I thought would be even more to my mind.
Again and again, drinking in the strangeness and the fearsomeness of the world from her lips, I had heard her state that if one offended an Italian, no matter how slightly and unintentionally, he was certain to retaliate by stabbing one in the back.
The Renaissance, penetrating northward, past first from Italy to France, but as early as the middle of the fifteenth century English students were frequenting the Italian universities.
Once more, however, the Italian ran over his round of melodies.
The count knows everything," said the Italian, bowing.
In this same library we saw some drawings by Michael Angelo (these Italians call him Mickel Angelo,) and Leonardo da Vinci.
He overwhelmed me with the wildest expressions of affection--exclaimed passionately, in his exaggerated Italian way, that he would hold his life henceforth at my disposal--and declared that he should never be happy again until he had found an opportunity of proving his gratitude by rendering me some service which I might remember, on my side, to the end of my days.
The Italian officers' uniforms are very much the most beautiful I have ever seen; and, as a general thing, the men in them were as handsome as the clothes.
This," answered Ezza gravely, "is not the costume of an Englishman, but of the Italian of the future.
only, an Italian, named Cropoli, escaped from the kitchens of the Marquis d'Ancre, came and took possession of this house.
She had an Italian cast of countenance and bearing, large black eyes beneath their well arched brows, a native nobleness, and candid grace.
She spoke of the Italian character; she became almost garrulous over the incident that had made her faint five minutes before.