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The "verb" in an infinitive phrase cannot be the verb in the sentence and might be bracketed off in the same way as a prepositional phrase:
Perhaps the most famous infinitive phrase in the English language is "To be or not to be" from Shakespeare's play Hamlet.
verbal--a word that is made from and thus resembles a verb but is used in a different way, for example, as a noun (see gerund and infinitive phrase) or adjective (see participle)
The "verb" in an infinitive phrase cannot be the verb in the sentence and might be boxed out in the same way as a prepositional phrase.
Box out the infinitive phrase in each sentence below.
(Of the latter, Pence and Emery say, "When a verb with an indirect object and a direct object is turned into the passive voice, one of the objects becomes the subject of the passive verb and the other object remains...as a retained object.") In this case, our retained object is an infinitive phrase. When employed as nouns, such phrases fly (as here) like flags from towers.
verbal--a word that looks like a verb but is used in a different way, for example, an infinitive phrase or a gerund verbal communication--communication through words, for example, speaking or writing; compare nonverbal communication
Thus, the example in (12) does not tell us anything about dare specifically, but rather about fronted infinitive phrases in ME in general.
(The root form does work well in the vacuum cleaner procedure shown in Figure 3 because the tide is meant as a directive.) Infinitive phrases are effective, but because of the strong sense of causality conveyed by the preposition "to," infinitive phrases preclude the option of adding a conceptual element and require the writer to proceed immediately to steps (the "title-to-step" design).