dysphagia

(redirected from Inability to eat)
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  • noun

Words related to dysphagia

condition in which swallowing is difficult or painful

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References in periodicals archive ?
Al-Zahrani had earlier said that the patient was referred to the KAMC when he began suffering from abdominal pain and bleeding in the intestine, as well as an inability to eat as a result of a tumor in the upper part of abdomen.
His awesome drinking and an inability to eat triggered bouts of violent vomiting and sickness and perhaps a terrifying awareness of impending doom.
A suspected case was defined as a history of acute onset of fever and any of the following: altered consciousness, inability to eat, neck stiffness, seizures, petechial rash, or bulging anterior fontanel in a child <2 years of age.
After several days of discomfort and inability to eat, he sought medical treatment.
Evie-Anne, aged two, has a catalogue of symptoms, including blindness, epilepsy, sleep apnea and the inability to eat.
ABDOMINAL PAIN, BURNING AND CRAMPING, and inability to eat led a 31-year-old man to visit his primary care physician.
Mucositis is a painful side effect of many cancer treatment regimens that can cause intense pain, infection and the inability to eat, drink or swallow.
Continuously growing teeth can lead to major problems such as infections or inability to eat, so visit your vet immediately to have them trimmed.
But his inability to eat doesn't stop Tyler from enjoying a normal life - he often plays football.
the inability to eat a healthy diet) which can place certain patients at risk.
He said the most common side-effects are the inability to eat certain foods, hair thinning if vitamins are not taken and ulcer formations if patients smoke.
Occasionally this results in the antlers locking together, which can doom both bucks to exhaustion and inability to eat or drink, and eventual death.
The latter was ascribed to inability to eat solid foods.
Burns claimed side effects from the augmentation treatment carried out at the London Centre for Aesthetic Surgery included painful swelling, blisters, heavy discharge, and an inability to eat, drink or speak.