improvisation

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  • noun

Synonyms for improvisation

Synonyms for improvisation

something improvised

Synonyms for improvisation

a creation spoken or written or composed extemporaneously (without prior preparation)

Related Words

an unplanned expedient

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a performance given extempore without planning or preparation

References in periodicals archive ?
When the volume appeared later that month, it consisted of Andrew of Padua, the Improvisatore together with another, shorter tale entitled The Vindictive Father, or Lorenzo and Claudia.
The adventures of the Improvisatore, related by himself, are little inferior in nature and genuine humour to the exploits of Gil Bias, and the best itinerant heroes of Fielding; Andrew is a true son of Fortune, but bears her vicissitudes in so good humoured a manner, and relates them with so much grace and nature, that (which is now seldom the case) we laid down the book with an actual feeling of regret.
Like Thomas Lovell Beddoes' almost contemporaneous, but much less effective use of the improvvisatore figure in his early volume of pseudo-medieval poetry, The Improvisatore (1821), the poetic improviser suggests a continuity with precapitalist forms of literary activity.
Improvised tales are objects of exchange, fungible with the improviser's subsistence, and Andrew of Padua, the Improvisatore is a remarkably honest fable illustrating the reciprocal consumption engaged in by the nineteenth-century periodical writer and the reading public.
Andrew of Padua, the Improvisatore was all too successful in achieving the status of a commodity, losing its individuality and memorability as a piece of imaginative fiction as it became interchangeable with other pieces of periodical fiction that were circulating in the libraries and bookstores of the metropolis.
In reply to Charsky's question, the improvisatore can only describe "the rush of sensations, the close connection between personal inspiration and another, outer will--it would be futile for me to try to explain it myself.
Certainly vostorg, "the intense condition of the unified imagination," is attested in the creative experience of the improvisatore with his glittering eyes.
Is the improvisatore a case of the impossible "vostorg bez vdokhnoveniia," rapture without recapture?
And yet the fictional improvisatore seems, further still, to represent rapture in an extreme degree of isolation from its other half.
The Improvisatore attracted no critical attention, but Beddoes's next volume, The Brides' Tragedy, published in 1822, got all the attention a young author could hope for.
9) I suggest that Susan Steele was the original for Eliza in The Improvisatore, lively, witty, inquisitive, well-read but untrained, poised at a moment of personal decision-making.
While Coleridge may also have been aware of Thomas Lovell Beddoes's The Improvisatore and Other Juvenilia (1821), Beddoes's ravings were privately printed in his first year at Oxford, and seemed immediately so embarrassing to the young man that he "eviscerated every volume he could lay his hands on"; his tales of horror "attracted but scanty notice.
By masculinizing the title from Improvisatrice to Improvisatore, Coleridge suggests that men suffer in love as well as women (as Lorenzo in The Improvisatrice certainly does), despite their social dominance.
While the Improvisatore claims to have forgotten the words of Moore's famous song, (21) he recalls its moral well enough to translate it into his own quatrain.
The second word of the poem's title is likewise significant, for it draws attention to the lyric's original source in a sonnet by the Italian improvisatore Francesco Gianni.