improve

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Synonyms for improve

get better

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recuperate

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Synonyms for improve

to advance to a more desirable state

Synonyms for improve

References in periodicals archive ?
In terms of energy, the AHS hydraulic drive concept with secondary control in a constant pressure circuit, ensures substantial efficiency improvability, a fact which places the solution in front of other similar types.
His work in education relied on his unexamined commitment to the inherent worth of each individual and an optimistic faith in the improvability of human kind.
To assert the improvability of ordinary women without relying on demonstrations of women's parity with men, historical exemplars, or richly textured positive portrayals, Wollstonecraft must root her claims about women in general principles about human nature, principles familiar to readers of her Vindication of the Rights of Men and of the debates swirling around the French Revolution.
The belief in the improvability of the world: that was what we had taken from our history.
Consider: "Like the gasoline engine, our industrial-age management model is languishing out at the far end of the S-curve, and may be reaching the limits of its improvability....
Contrasting notions about learning from the past in an incremental fashion assume not a millenarian perfectibility of mankind or ending of history, but a notion of improvability. But the past may still be jettisoned if it does not contribute to, or correspond with, the required lesson.
Black club women "adopted 'Lifting as we Climb' as their motto, connoting a belief in the improvability of all black women; there is no natural inferiority, then, just socially produced inferiority.
(a) The attempt to understand Lavater in the context of his own time: not as a populist charlatan, but as a representative of the difficult transition from theological to secular anthropology (who, for example, inspired vitalist anatomy and medicine), a thinker with philanthropic intent who upheld the Christian principles of man's improvability and free will while simultaneously attempting to provide an empirical basis for the study of humankind.
In histories like Montgomery's Leading Facts, published in Boston 1893, for example, the successes of the post--Civil War period were measured primarily in industrial productivity, for, the author noted, the region produced twice as many bales of cotton in 1893 than it did in 1860, and "the white man does about half the work; the black man, the other half." "Common schools," Montgomery added, as an afterthought, "have multiplied all through the South,--they are free to black and white alike." (37) This kind of progress was precisely what Virginia school superintendent Ruffner had pointed to as freedmen's "improvability" and as evidence of the pressing need to educate blacks in public schools.
And the enlightenment highlighted other fundamental differences in political approach: logic versus faith in reasoning through dilemmas; optimism versus pessimism regarding the improvability (though not perfectability) of the human condition; and embracing versus resisting the serendipitous changes wrought by economics, technology, and science.
These are accuracy (empirical claims about practice are well founded in evidence), effectiveness (theories meet the goals and values of those who hold them), coherence (competing theories from outside perspectives are considered) and improvability (theories and solutions can be adapted to meet changing needs or incorporate new goals, values and contextual constraints).
(35.) Anson Phelps Stokes, "Founder's Day Address: Human Improvability," delivered at Hampton Institute, 29 January 1922, ASPFP, Box 208, Folder 151.