martyr

(redirected from Heroic martyrdom)
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Synonyms for martyr

put to death

Synonyms

be a martyr to something

Synonyms

  • suffer from
  • be troubled by
  • be afflicted with
  • be seriously affected by
  • be a sufferer from

Synonyms for martyr

one who suffers for the sake of principle

Synonyms

Related Words

one who voluntarily suffers death as the penalty for refusing to renounce their religion

kill as a martyr

Related Words

torture and torment like a martyr

References in periodicals archive ?
Ansar al-Sunna said: "One of the lions of Islam launched _ a heroic martyrdom operation on a huge congregation of agent policemen protecting the party headquarters of the apostate Iyad Allawi.
Kurdi names Yeats's Cathleen ni Houlihan the prototype of the Irish history play in the sense that in juxtaposing patriotic self-sacrifice with the pettiness of retiring into ordinary private life it offers an ambiguous judgment of heroic martyrdom.
Popular Sikh histories of today are united in their claim that the execution in 1606 of the fifth Sikh Master, Guru Arjan has always been understood as an heroic martyrdom.
This not only explicates the model of heroic martyrdom established by Foxe in the rich paradigmatic case of the preacher John Rogers but also brings into focus the ideological bent of Foxe's whole enterprise, both in its conception of the life of faith (zealously anti-Catholic, everywhere elevating experience and the Word) and in its constant shift to legitimize the Elizabethan religious, and political, settlement as a hard-won victory over Marian oppression and error.
As the vivid and still moving illustrations alone suggest (including woodcuts of the burnings of John Rogers and Rawlins White from Acts and Monuments, an engraving of the slaughter of the Waldensians from a 1658 work by Samuel Morland, and Faithful's trial in Vanity Fair from the 1688 edition of Bunyan's The Pilgrim's Progress), Knott's concern is to illustrate both the continuity and development of the tradition of heroic martyrdom in English literature.