hero

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  • noun

Synonyms for hero

protagonist

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idol

Synonyms for hero

a person revered especially for noble courage

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Synonyms for hero

a man distinguished by exceptional courage and nobility and strength

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the principal character in a play or movie or novel or poem

someone who fights for a cause

Greek mathematician and inventor who devised a way to determine the area of a triangle and who described various mechanical devices (first century)

(classical mythology) a being of great strength and courage celebrated for bold exploits

(Greek mythology) priestess of Aphrodite who killed herself when her lover Leander drowned while trying to swim the Hellespont to see her

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a large sandwich made of a long crusty roll split lengthwise and filled with meats and cheese (and tomato and onion and lettuce and condiments)

References in periodicals archive ?
In conclusion, the fictional account of the hero-cult of Neoptolemos at Delphi provided by Heliodoros would have been unthinkable at the dramatic date of the Aithiopika (some time during the Persian occupation of Egypt in the 5th and 4th centuries BC), since the notion of the son of Achilles as a spirit who was kindly disposed to the Delphians had not yet been established.
Pausanias and the sacrificial rituals of Greek hero-cults.
It is not surprising, therefore, that the only attempt to arrive at a definition accounting for all the cases of Greek heroism is, to my knowledge, Walter Burkert's remark that 'it is some extraordinary quality that makes the hero; something unpredictable and uncanny is left behind and is always present'; whereas the Oxford Classical Dictionary defines the hero-cult as 'the worship, as being superhuman, of noteworthy dead men and women, real or imaginary, normally at their actual or supposed tombs'.
29) That the enduring of labours was seen as inseparable from the hero's mission follows also from the fact that Socrates is presented in Plato's Apology as describing his own mission in terms of labours: 'I have to describe to you my wanderings, similar to those of one who endures labours '(30) In his description of the Sicyonian cult of Adrastus, Herodotus supplies what seems to be our only direct evidence that the idea of labours and the hero-cult might have been felt to be mutually connected: 'Besides other things, the Sicyonians used to honour Adrastus with tragic choruses on account of his sufferings.
Finally, de Polignac surveys hero-cults, arguing that they represent a way of legitimizing claims to power over the land on the part of one group over another.