Hausa

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  • noun

Synonyms for Hausa

a member of a Negroid people living chiefly in northern Nigeria

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the chief member of the Chadic family of Afroasiatic languages

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References in periodicals archive ?
A resident of the town who gave his name as Mallam Abdullahi believes the Hausa own the town.
The Tiv people suffered at the hands of their chiefs because the Hausa workers of the Whiteman increased the suffering of Tiv people.
In the 1960s, thousands of southern Igbos living in the north were slaughtered by indigenous Hausas.
Predominately Hausa, 'yan hisba focused on non-Hausa Muslims, such as Muslim Yoruba, the second largest ethnic group of Nigerian Muslims, as a powerful stumbling block to Islamic unity and reform, and in 2004, 'yan hisbah and 'yan daba used petrol bombs to kill and injure hundreds of persons in Kano whom they referred to as arna (unbelievers), Kiristoci (Christians), and baki (strangers).
Right from the beginning of the missionary work in Igboland, the missionaries attempted to offer the people basic literacy in their native language as they also did among the Hausas and Yoruba.
Los hausas tambien habitan en la vecina Nigeria, donde junto a los yorubas e ibos, entre otras etnias, son la base en la que se asienta la identidad etnica de esa nacion.
Yet, as in most predominantly Muslim communities along this stretch of West Africa, the Hausa influence on politics, religion, and social status is difficult to deny, particularly considering that Malam Bako founded the community for Hausas as a refuge from other Muslims.
Witnesses said dozens of people were killed in two Lagos slums where the fighting between Yoruba and Hausa men started over the weekend.
There are long-standing hostilities between the mainly Muslim Hausas and the Yorubas, the majority of whom are Christians and animists.
If the Ewe (Welch 1966) and the Yoruba (Asiwaju 1976) have been conspicuous in the academic treatment received to date, the Hausa have remained another deserving-though lower profile - case study; hence Professor Miles' perceptive study is both opportune and revealing.
There are long-standing ethnic enmities between the mainly Muslim Hausas and the southern Yorubas, who are Christians and animists.
3 and Hausas are claiming they are more populous than Yoruba and Igbo by falsifying census figures but this act will not do them any good because truth will manifest one day.
That was the price the Hausas paid for their hospitality in granting access to grazing land to the Fulani immigrant settlers.
For most of the media, a report of a conflict between Hausas and Fulanis, even when their reporters, ensconced in the urban centers, learn about this, is not attractive for coverage.
Are the Hausas that are allegedly marginalising other Nigerians not suffering?