Greece


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Synonyms for Greece

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Had Greece, says a judicious observer on her fate, been united by a stricter confederation, and persevered in her union, she would never have worn the chains of Macedon; and might have proved a barrier to the vast projects of Rome.
The Abbe Mably, in his observations on Greece, says that the popular government, which was so tempestuous elsewhere, caused no disorders in the members of the Achaean republic, BECAUSE IT WAS THERE TEMPERED BY THE GENERAL AUTHORITY AND LAWS OF THE CONFEDERACY.
Whilst the Amphictyonic confederacy remained, that of the Achaeans, which comprehended the less important cities only, made little figure on the theatre of Greece. When the former became a victim to Macedon, the latter was spared by the policy of Philip and Alexander.
The more effectually to nourish discord and disorder the Romans had, to the astonishment of those who confided in their sincerity, already proclaimed universal liberty[1] throughout Greece. With the same insidious views, they now seduced the members from the league, by representing to their pride the violation it committed on their sovereignty.
And by degrees, as the power of Greece grew less, the power of Turkey grew greater.
It was indeed but the old learning of Greece. Yet there was in it something that can never grow old, for it was human.
"Why Greece? (What is it, Minnie dear--jam?) Why not Tunbridge Wells?
"I for one will help her to go to Greece. Will you?"
We might have known the weather would break up soon; and now Lucy wants to go to Greece. I don't know what the world's coming to."
Honeychurch greatly--he bent her to their purpose, "I don't see why Greece is necessary," she said; "but as you do, I suppose it is all right.
Beebe heard her kiss Lucy and say: "I am sorry I was so cross about Greece, but it came on the top of the dahlias."
After all, there was no reason that Lucy should talk about Greece or thank him for persuading her mother, so he said good-bye.
Was this fair Helen, whose admired worth Made Greece with ten years' war afflict poor Troy?
The Attic Plain, barring the grape-vines, was a barren, desolate, unpoetical waste--I wonder what it was in Greece's Age of Glory, five hundred years before Christ?
Xerxes took that mighty citadel four hundred and eighty years before Christ, when his five millions of soldiers and camp-followers followed him to Greece, and if we four Americans could have remained unmolested five minutes longer, we would have taken it too.