governor

(redirected from Governour)
Also found in: Dictionary, Legal, Financial, Encyclopedia.
Graphic Thesaurus  🔍
Display ON
Animation ON
Legend
Synonym
Antonym
Related
  • noun

Synonyms for governor

Synonyms for governor

a control that maintains a steady speed in a machine (as by controlling the supply of fuel)

References in periodicals archive ?
(15) The constitution of noble subjects was thought to be in equilibrium, and numerous regimens (Elyot's Boke named the Governour is a case in point) assisted the nobility in harnessing the environment to the purpose of maintaining the presumed superiority of their natures.
Initially, he becomes "Governour" through disguises and disembodiments that inflate the extent of his power and the number of his followers (Life 193).
As John Davenport expressed it: 'In regular actings of the creature, God is the first Agent; there are not two several and distinct actings, one of God, another of the People: but in one and the same action, God, by the People suffrages, makes such an one Governour, or Magistrate, and not another'.
In Thomas Elyot's The Boke Named the Governour amity is envisaged as something to prize, and ingratitude as a malevolent force capable of destroying it:
the Governour and Company of the Colony of Connecticut, 1703-1774." PhD diss., Yale University, 2008.
After the Committee reported its work, interpretations continued to point in the same direction--either explicitly acknowledging, or consistent with, use of "case" and "controversy" to mean "suit." For example, on August 30, 1787, Governour Morris proposed an amendment to the Committee of the Whole granting Congress the power to make rules and regulations governing the territories.
of the Governour and the Company of Merchants of London Trading into East Indies 1600-1619 (London: Bernard Quaritch, Piccadilly London, Anno Domini MDCCCXCIII), available online at <http://books.google.com/books?id=sc0NAAAAIAAJ&printsec=titlepage& source=gbs_summary_r&cad=0>, accessed May 10, 2009.
Likewise, Governor Burnet told the Massachusetts House in 1728 that the British Parliaments "have a just Claim to be a Pattern to the Assemblies in the Plantations.'" Governour William Buruet, Speech to the Massachusetts House of Representatives (July 24, 1728), in 8 JOURNALS OF THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES OF MASSACHUSETTS 1727--1729, at 245, 245 (1927).
(124.) A Proclamation, By His Excellency Richard Earl of Bellomont, Captain General and Governour in Chief of His Majesties Province of New-York, and Territories Depending thereon in America, And Vice-Admiral of the Same, &c: (William Bradford 1698) (copy on file with author).
For more on the Elizabethan Settlement--the name commonly given to a set of 1559 statutes nullifying Mary Tudor's efforts to reunite England with Rome, and establishing Elizabeth as the "Supreme Governour" of the English church, see Michael Graves, Elizabethan Parliaments 1559-1601 (London: Longman, 1996), 24-27, and Norman Jones, Faith by Statute: Parliament and the Settlement of Religion, 1559 (London: Royal Historical Society, 1992).
The related discussions, lucid and interesting though they often are, of The Boke Named the Governour, Euphues, The Faerie Queene, Damon and Pithias, The Malcontent, The Maid's Tragedy, The Atheist's Tragedy, the plays of Marlowe and Jonson, etc., are likely to leave readers wishing for deeper analysis of fewer texts.
(10.) The Frame of the Government of the Province of Pennsylvania in America: Together with certain laws Agreed upon in England by the Governour and the Divers Free-Men of the aforesaid Province (London: A.
(23) The Treaty held that the "Indian Kings and Queens" would "henceforth acknowledge to have their immediate Depenency [sic] on, and own [sic] all Subjection to the Great King of England." (24) In addition to recognizing the King of England as their overlord, the Native American signatories of the Treaty were required to convey "Three Indian Arrows" per year in lieu of quit rent, (25) as well as a tribute of twenty beaver skins to the governor as evidence of their "Obedience to the Right Honourable [sic] His Majesties Governour [sic] ...
It was in response to the New Jersey Plan that Alexander Hamilton in turn delivered his famous speech of June 18, noteworthy among other things for the praise bestowed on the British constitution and also for proposing an executive "Governour" to serve for life.