Geordie

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Related to Geordies: Howay the lads
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Words related to Geordie

a native of Newcastle-upon-Tyne

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the nonstandard dialect of natives of Newcastle-upon-Tyne

References in periodicals archive ?
The firm carried out a poll on social media which asked followers to identify the UK's sexiest accent and the results may well leave Geordies red-faced.
Well, in thepoll reported by Sky News, the accents ranking below Geordie are the South Welsh Valleys; Yorkshire and then Cockney which complete the list of the top 10.
I WAS born to be a Geordie, and a Geordie I will be, Until I breathe no more and they dig a grave for me.
Long before hedonism became an essential part of growing up, Geordies were famous for their boisterous behavior and hard-drinking ways.
NEWCASTLE fans last night insisted that the man who replaces Ruud Gullit must be a born-and-bred Geordie.
THE luckiest postcode for striking the Geordie Jackpot has been revealed.
Over time, the lamps and the miners themselves became known as Geordies.
NE1 started the new online lottery scheme which gives Geordies the chance to win PS25,000 and help boost Newcastle at the same time.
The poll also found, however, that Geordies were among those least likely to start conversations with potential dates.
It was even sung by Liverpool fans as a tribute to Newcastle lad Andy Carroll when he played for them and, of course, is sung all over the world by exile Geordies pining for home.
The `wildlife' special shows spectacular elements of the Geordies' life cycle include mass migrations to nightclubs, power struggles within the herd, getting 'mortaled', intricate mating rituals and the hunt for food.
My two Westies, Lily and Rose are also Geordies and were clapping their paws with excitement when they heard the news!" Sue Fowler: "Congratulations Marie.
But Joan failed to live up to the hype, responding with "och aye," in a distinctly Scottish twang, leading to Jonathan apologising to any Geordies watching.