geocentric

(redirected from Geocentric model)
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Antonyms for geocentric

having the earth as the center

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References in periodicals archive ?
The geocentric model of outer space results in a legal dichotomy in which things exist either on Earth or in outer space: a legal dichotomy that is reflected in the very nature of the Outer Space Treaty.
Galileo's numerous observations supported Aristarchus and Copernicus's heliocentric solar system model, not the Catholic Church's accepted dogma of Ptolemy's geocentric model. In 1632, Galileo published his book, Dialogue on the Two Chief World Systems (historic note, the Pilgrims landed at Plymouth Rock in 1620) in which he supports Copernicus's heliocentric solar system model.
project are to construct a geocentric model of the Earth-Sun system
As Arthur Koestler noted in The Sleepwalkers (1990), "Kepler was a pauper who came from a family of misfits," while Tycho "was a grand seigneur from the Hamlet country" and "an eccentric in the grand style." The fact that Tycho was wrong, that he stubbornly clung to a geocentric model, and that Kepler was right, at least on the issue that divided them, is not relevant to a criminal investigation.
The geocentric model was improved through the heliocentric model; then Newton's space and time were changed into the spacetime of Minkowski and Einstein.
Not only is the basis of the geocentric model sound, but it is even consistent with our knowledge of the Divine.
It is a wonderful teaching tool to convey understanding of the geocentric model of things.
In a geocentric model, opposition can be made to coincide with a superior planet's closest approach to Earth only if in the time it takes for the planet to return to the perigee of its epicycle the Sun has moved so that the Earth is again precisely between it and the planet (see Figure 2).
Drawing on Dante's two most famous works--The Banquet, and The Divine Comedy, Grzybowski explores the impact that the cosmological picture of the universe and the geocentric model had on the mentality of medieval Europeans.
For example, Ptolemy and his acolytes did not really believe that their geocentric model was a physically realistic picture of the universe, but instead viewed it as a model consistent with observations and capable of reasonable predictions.
A confrontation between how things look from a fixed position above the Earth and the view from space (where the Earth revolves around the sun) should help in overcoming the inherent geocentric model.
In part one, the reasons for questioning the geocentric model, traditional Ptolemaic arguments and theological arguments against it, and the general approach to the new argument are presented.