food

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Synonyms for food

Synonyms for food

Synonyms for food

References in periodicals archive ?
The demographics of consumers have strongly influenced attitudes toward genetically modified food as well.
The global planting and trade of genetically modified food can not only solve the problem of global food shortage, but also can realize commercial benefits.
Genetically modified food. Retrieved November 29, 2013 from http://apjcn.nhri.org.tw/server/info/articles/genefood/GMO.htm
The first genetically modified foods to go on the market in the 1980s were typically crops designed by chemical companies to resist herbicides and pesticides.
It offers products for livestock and pets.Country: , USASector: HealthcareTarget: Smaller targets in agrobusiness and genetically modified food technology sectors, Pfizer's animal healthcare unitBuyer: Bayer AGVendor: Pfizer IncType: Corporate acquisitionStatus: BiddingComment: The unit is valued by analysts at up to USD16bn.
Food fray; inside the controversy over genetically modified food.
By law, caterers are obliged to tell customers if they use GM products under the Genetically Modified Food Regulations Act, 2004.
Our supermarkets are full of genetically modified food without a label mentioning this "negative nutritive specificity" as per international norms.
Genetically modified food has genes from other plants or animals inserted into its genetic structure.
With an ever-increasing global population, hunger in the developing world, and the health risks of pesticides, some experts view genetically modified food as a panacea.
EU Regulation 1829/2003 bans genetically modified food and feed products unless specifically excepted by that regulation.
To fully understand the evolution of genetically modified food regulation in the EU, one must place it against the broader context of the fundamental institutional change that has been taking place in Europe over the last decade.
Importantly, this procedure involves more than a straightforward scientific evaluation of the safety of the genetically modified food. There is an opportunity for the Member States to block approvals of new genetically modified foods (as they have been doing for years), and the regulation explicitly invites consideration of other legitimate factors, meaning factors other than food safety.
It is becoming increasingly hard to see exactly how the Government is going to "sell" genetically modified food to the electorate.
This excellent abridged reading permits the non-scientist to grasp the fundamentals of mapping the human genome, studying human characteristics and genetic mutations, and creating genetically modified food for a hungry planet.
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