fiction

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  • noun

Synonyms for fiction

tale

Synonyms

lie

Synonyms for fiction

any fictitious idea accepted as part of an ideology by an uncritical group; a received idea

a narrative not based on fact

Synonyms

Synonyms for fiction

a literary work based on the imagination and not necessarily on fact

a deliberately false or improbable account

References in periodicals archive ?
Fiction, in all its shapes and guises, is pivotal to human experience.
American Political Fictions: War on Errorism in Contemporary American Literature, Culture, and Politics.
Despite widespread evidence that fictional models play an explanatory role in science, resistance remains to the idea that fictions can explain.
And in the Soviet Union, with its political control of publishing through the Writers Union, there was, nevertheless, a thriving science-fiction community in which the Strugatsky brothers, Arkady and Boris, bestrode the landscape as Lem did in Poland, and published their imaginative fictions with intimations of antigovernmental positions.
We make use of contrary-to-fact or could-be notions--like juristic fictions in legal cases, conjectured events in historiography, and counterfactual scenarios in political journalism--to make sense of our world.
Why is Maliszewski trying to "expose" a professional storyteller for telling fictions?
Moreover, the perspective students formulate from readings and lectures on novels can harden into a discriminatory filter, a rigid scheme for sifting fictions and judging their quality.
As Harding discovered, Haraway was interested in what she refers to as 'the narratives of scientific fact--those potent fictions of science--within a complex field indicated by the signifier SF.' Judith Merril was her inspiration to do so.
"Necessary Fictions: Fictional Reflexivity in Works by Vladimir Nabokov, Flann O'Brien, Gilbert Sorrentino, and John Barth." Diss.
At the end of a section on community, for instance, Roth notes that analytic detective fiction's conclusions precisely oppose those of psychoanalytic fictions, as the former "find[s] its destiny in validating repression" (161).
Fictions are games of make-believe, and in such games we may experience fear and anxiety (or at least quasi-fear and quasi-anxiety).[5]
Such big questions have long been raised by philosophers and scientists, as well as by theologians and science fiction writers.
The Science Fiction of Phyllis Gotlieb: A Critical Reading
The Span of Mainstream and Science Fiction. Jefferson, NC: McFarland Publishing, 2002.
Storhoff considers all of Johnson's major fiction published up until the time of the writing.