cancer

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Synonyms for cancer

Synonyms for cancer

any malignant growth or tumor caused by abnormal and uncontrolled cell division

(astrology) a person who is born while the sun is in Cancer

a small zodiacal constellation in the northern hemisphere

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the fourth sign of the zodiac

References in periodicals archive ?
Private practice: Julie Malan, Registered Genetic Counsellor, tel: 082 553 5891 Familial Cancer Clinic at Femina Hospital, tel: 021 328 2676
Familial cancer syndromes, including breast/ovarian and colon cancers, are perhaps the most recognized example of this.
Melanoma and breast cancer are fairly common bedfellows in familial cancer syndromes, and both types of cancer have been linked with mutations in cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 2A, a tumor suppressor gene, in some studies of familial cancer cohorts.
In the past, physicians had to rely on a family history that suggested a risk of this familial cancer.
Researchers examined the 16INK4A gene because of its suspected role in the progression of retinoblastoma and its involvement in a predisposition to familial cancer.
For example, if a patient's grandmother had breast cancer when she was 65, an aunt had cervical cancer at age 25, and an uncle had lung cancer because he smoked, that may indeed be a strong family history of cancer, but when you ask if this is consistent with a familial cancer syndrome, it is not," Dr.
We're not suggesting that every familial cancer syndrome involves p53," he says.
Young-onset cancer is a hallmark of many familial cancer syndromes, but it was not clear whether family members of young-onset familial pancreatic cancer patients were at greater risk than family members of older-onset patients.
For patients at higher risk due to personal or familial cancer history, the ACS recommends screening colonoscopies as often as every three years.
Screening should be conducted at a place with expertise in an effort to minimize false-positive results, which often lead to biopsy," said Dr Claudine Isaacs, an associate professor of medicine and co-director of the Fisher Centre for Familial Cancer Research, Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Centre at Georgetown University.
Professor Jacobs' clinical activities and expertise include the surgical management of gynecological cancer, management of familial cancer and screening for ovarian and cervical cancer.
Both physicians encourage women who carry BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations to enroll in clinical research trials aimed at improving strategies for prevention, surveillance, and treatment of women with familial cancer predispositions.
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