electroconvulsive therapy

(redirected from Electric shock Therapy)
Also found in: Dictionary, Medical, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Graphic Thesaurus  🔍
Display ON
Animation ON
Legend
Synonym
Antonym
Related
  • noun

Synonyms for electroconvulsive therapy

the administration of a strong electric current that passes through the brain to induce convulsions and coma

References in periodicals archive ?
USA], Aug 16 ( ANI ): Older people receiving electric shock therapy, also known as electroconvulsive therapy (ECT), to combat the blues of age will need an additional treatment if insomnia is one of their symptoms, according to a recent study.
A one point she started having electric shock therapy, saying she needed it "every six weeks to blow apart the cement in my brain".
A PATIENT who received electric shock therapy for depression more than 20 times has said the treatment is "barbaric" and should be outlawed.
Most people with depression are prescribed drugs and therapy but many don't respond to this- electric shock therapy is the only resort but has serious side effects, including memory loss.
To introduce the concept of shock therapy, Klein draws upon the work of Ewen Cameron, a psychologist who pioneered the use of electric shock therapy, in the 1950s.
He traces the causes of his father's manic depression, exploring the racial abuse he suffered as a child during World War I due to his German ancestry, and the electric shock therapy he received as an adult.
She was institutionalised and ended up having electric shock therapy.
Electric shock therapy - The Mental Health and Substance Abuse Committee heard testimony on a bill to restrict and regulate the use of aversive therapy including electric shock, corporal punishment, aromatic ammonia and Tabasco sauce on disabled students (S 1123).
What might the exploits of a US psychiatrist who pioneered the use of electric shock therapy in the late 1940s have to do with an economic school of thought that gained prominence three decades later?
Its purpose was to address the history--and, apparently, ongoing use--of electric shock therapy administered to gays and lesbians as a means of changing their sexual orientation.
That Peter Green survived his illness, and the electric shock therapy they gave him, is little short of a miracle.
Their role also includes helping psychiatric patients receiving electric shock therapy and providing sedation and anaesthesia for patients having radiology and radio-therapy.
The test was done using electric shock therapy, treatment with scopolamine (an anticholinergic agent that produces deficits in learning and memory retention) as well as testing mice that had never been on the electric grid before.