Einstein's general theory of relativity


Also found in: Dictionary, Wikipedia.
Graphic Thesaurus  🔍
Display ON
Animation ON
Legend
Synonym
Antonym
Related
  • noun

Synonyms for Einstein's general theory of relativity

a generalization of special relativity to include gravity (based on the principle of equivalence)

References in periodicals archive ?
Its effects were discovered in 1998, but physicists still do not know what it is, and its very existence calls into question Albert Einstein's General Theory of Relativity.
The Mainichi , Japan's leading daily, writes in its editorial: "The detection of the waves does much more than simply confirm a part of Einstein's general theory of relativity. It promises to allow us to observe the birth of black holes, the hearts of supernovae, and other astronomical phenomena that cannot be seen in visible light, X-rays, electromagnetic waves or any of the other emissions...
Gravitational waves blanket the universe with tremors, as theorized a century ago with Albert Einstein's general theory of relativity and detected in 2015 by the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory, or Advanced LIGO, with giant lasers in Louisiana and Washington states.
Inside Einstein's Mind: The Enigma of Space and Time BBC Four, 9pm David Tennant narrates this docu-drama exploring the story behind Albert Einstein's General Theory of Relativity, which turned science's understanding of gravity, space and time on its head when it was published in November 1915.
That's what happened when physicists starting in the 1930s discovered quantum mechanics, which challenged Einstein's general theory of relativity, and which eventually morphed into string theory in the 1980s (and yes, I'm simplifying here), which harmonized general relativity and quantum mechanics.
Today, the Lovell Telescope plays a key role in world-leading research on pulsars, testing our understanding of extreme physics including Einstein's general theory of relativity, the university said.
Because [Albert] Einstein's general theory of relativity does not choose a time orientation, if a black hole can form from the gravitational collapse of matter through an event horizon in the future, then the reverse process is also possible.
When I was first acquainted with Smarandache geometries many years ago, I immediately started applying them, in order to extend the basic geometry of Einstein's General Theory of Relativity.
Over the decades, the orbit's long axis has been precessing (shifting direction) only one-fourth as fast as predicted using Einstein's general theory of relativity. Could something be wrong with relativity itself?
"It showed that the universe must have begun with a singularity, if Einstein's general theory of relativity is correct.
Ferris takes Einstein's General Theory of Relativity and in a few of pages offers what journalist Charles Krauthammer has described "as intuitive an account of its essential idea - the curvature of space - as I have ever read." Ferris also brings a light touch to other subjects as shown by this commentary on black holes: "Toss in anything you like encyclopedias, nuclear submarines, whole faculties of social scientists - and the black hole, like a prisoner of war reciting only name, rank, and serial number, will tell you nothing more than its mass, its rotation, and its electrical charge."
Basing his theorizing on equations that were part of Einstein's general theory of relativity, Willem de Sitter claimed in 1917 that the Universe was expanding.
Einstein's general theory of relativity allows for the possibility of time loops as a result of the warping and folding of time.
In Einstein's general theory of relativity, massive objects warp the fabric of spacetime, creating a gravitational pull and slowing time nearby.
Owen Sheers' script is lyrical and clever, weaving the past with the present day and seamlessly incorporating other aspects of news from the time, from the Senghenydd colliery disaster to Albert Einstein's general theory of relativity. A focus on an important piece of history and a real triumph for Welsh theatre.
Full browser ?