Dutch elm disease


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Words related to Dutch elm disease

disease of elms caused by a fungus

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Dutch elm disease arrived in Cleveland on a shipment of bark beetle-infested logs in 1930.
PS60 Subsidised cost of 45 saplings to farmers in Essex and Suffolk 29 Number in millions of trees to be planted to create new forests 60 Number in millions of trees wiped out by Dutch elm disease
Although the ravages of Dutch Elm Disease are especially evident to anyone taking a train journey through southern England, Wales is not as well endowed with woodlands as some might suppose.
Before the onslaught of Dutch elm disease, American elms were a beloved urban tree thanks to their leafy canopy and ability to tolerate air pollution, road salt, and extremes in weather.
The state Department of Conservation and Recreation gave Oakham a $1,100 grant in February 2006 to prune dead limbs and inoculate the tree against Dutch elm disease.
Dutch Elm disease, which is carried by a bark beetle, has affected an estimated 25 million elm trees in the UK since 1970, out of a population of about 30 million.
No tree was more beloved for city streets and backyards than the American elm, which fell victim to Dutch elm disease and all but vanished from the urban landscape.
Dr Thomas, whose findings are in the Journal of Ecology, said: "It is likely that almost all ash trees in Europe will be wiped out, just as the elm was largely eliminated by Dutch elm disease."
The national co-champion American elm, a beautiful, classically shaped elm that graced a field in Grand Traverse County, Michigan, died after a two-year stuggle against Dutch elm disease. The champ, known as the Buckley Elm, was diagnosed in 2001 with the fungus that devastated cities in the mid-part of the last century and still wipes out thousands of elms each year.
Imported diseases in recent years have included classical swine fever, potato brown rot, wheat mozaic virus, leaf wilt, rhizomania and Dutch elm disease.
One--the national champion American elm, in Grand Traverse County, Michigan--has recently been declared dead from Dutch elm disease.
Dutch elm disease permanently altered our forests in the 1970s, wiping out 25 million trees.
(Elms were dying of the still-incurable Dutch elm disease.)
Fine Gael Senator Paudie Coffey said it could do as much damage to our landscape as Dutch Elm disease and could threaten garden shrubs.
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