Dipsacus fullonum


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Related to Dipsacus fullonum: Dipsacus sylvestris, Dipsacus sativus
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  • noun

Synonyms for Dipsacus fullonum

teasel with lilac flowers native to Old World but naturalized in North America

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References in periodicals archive ?
Wild carrot, Queen Anne's-lace Dipsacus fullonum L.
Best of all is Dipsacus fullonum, the woodland teasel, a majestic plant growing up to six feet tall, with a spiny stem, long dark green leaves and a huge thistle-like flower.
The capitula of Succisa pratensis and Dipsacus fullonum. Ann.
Teasels (Dipsacus fullonum), which grow wild on chalky downland and railway sidings, are handsome and are invaluable in dried flower arrangements.
Scientific name Common name Pre-1940 Alliaria petiolata garlic mustard Artemesia vulgaris mugwort Carduus nutans (D) musk thistle Centaurea stoebe spotted knapweed Cirsium arvense Canada thistle x Cirsium vulgare bull thistle x Clematis terniflora sweet autumn clematis Conium maculatum (D) poison hemlock Convolvulus arvense field bindweed x Coronilla varia (P) crown vetch x Cynanchum louiseae black swallow-wort x Daucus carota Queen Anne's lace x Dioscorea polystachya (D) Chinese yam Dipsacus fullonum common teasel x Dipsacus laciniatus cut-leaved teasel x Euphorbia esula leafy spurge x Glechoma hederacea creeping Charlie x Hesperis matronalis dame's rocket x Humulus japonicus (D) Japanese hops Hypericum perforatum St.
fasdculatum Dichanthelium Poa compressa * oligosanthes Dichanthelium Poa pratensis * villosissimum Dipsacus fullonum * Poten tilla norvegica Elaeagnus Pycnanthemum umbellata * virginianum Eleocharis sp.
Teasel (Dipsacus fullonum) still takes pride of place in several parts of the garden and gives bees, butterflies nectar and pollen as well as satisfying the gold finches in the autumn and winter with its supply of protein and fat rich seeds.
Teasel (Dipsacus fullonum) attracts butterflies and bees, producing rosettes of spine-coated leaves in the first year and conical heads of purple flowers on tall stems in the second.