diminutive

(redirected from Diminutives)
Also found in: Dictionary.
Graphic Thesaurus  🔍
Display ON
Animation ON
Legend
Synonym
Antonym
Related
  • all
  • adj
  • noun

Synonyms for diminutive

Synonyms for diminutive

Synonyms for diminutive

a word that is formed with a suffix (such as -let or -kin) to indicate smallness

Related Words

References in periodicals archive ?
Lead researcher Mitsuhiko Ota said, "Our findings suggest that diminutives and reduplication, which are frequently found in baby talk words - across many different languages - can facilitate the early stage of vocabulary development."
They found that infants who heard a higher proportion of diminutive words and words with repeated syllables developed their language more quickly between nine and 21 months.
meaning which diminutives can also express optional?
* Do all meanings which can be expressed by diminutives belong to one and the same conceptual space of metonymically linked assessments?
Semantic analyses of diminutives usually take as their starting point the meaning of 'small', or 'small in size' (see Jurafsky 1996, Taylor 2003).
Furthermore, whereas nominal diminutives are relatively well described in many languages, little attention has been given to diminutive verbs so far (3).
As for the formation of diminutives, the most productive suffix is certainly - ie; other Scots diminutive suffixes, such as -ock, -kin and -ag do not seem to occur in SSE.
The purpose of the present paper, then, is to demonstrate that diminutive formation may be accounted for without recourse to highly abstract underlying representations, rules, or constraints, but by analogy to other fully specified pairs of bases and their corresponding diminutives in the mental lexicon.
Much is made of Belleau's "ubiquitous diminutives and present participles whose superabundance Weber describes caustically as 'la deformation mignarde'" (244).
She is also an exquisite dancer who can warm and fill the diminutives of baroque style.
To this end the paper is structured as follows: in part two the nature of evaluation in language and the role of morphological means in the process are discussed; part three reviews the possibility of widening the category beyond traditional gradation, diminution and augmentation; part four touches upon the prototypical features of evaluative meanings of diminutives and augmentatives in Bulgarian; part five raises a few relevant discussion points and in part six a few conclusions and venues for further research are outlined.
Moreover, he identifies two perspectives of evaluative morphology: the objective/descriptive or quantitative perspective, represented by diminutives and augmentatives (i.e.
In previous studies of diminutives and interjections, DIs have received little attention.
The markers which morphologically encode these distinctions are labelled diminutives (= smaller size), augmentatives (= bigger size), appreciatives (= something is good), depreciatives (= something is bad).
The truth about diminutives is not easily found, given the specific nature of this phenomenon.