deception

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Synonyms for deception

Synonyms for deception

Synonyms for deception

References in classic literature ?
Nothing that he said or did shook my opinion of the disgraceful series of falsehoods that he had told in my presence the day before, or of the cruel deception by which he had separated Lady Glyde from her sister, and had sent her uselessly to London, when she was half distracted with anxiety on Miss Halcombe's account.
The whole cruelty of Sir Percival's deception had fallen on poor Lady Glyde.
The disgrace of lending herself to a vile deception is the only disgrace with which I can conscientiously charge Mrs.
Rubelle to Blackwater Park, it was his misfortune and not his fault, when that foreign person was base enough to assist a deception planned and carried out by the master of the house.
But to return to the subject we were discussing just now, the enchantment of the lady Dulcinea, I look upon it as certain, and something more than evident, that Sancho's idea of practising a deception upon his master, making him believe that the peasant girl was Dulcinea and that if he did not recognise her it must be because she was enchanted, was all a device of one of the enchanters that persecute Don Quixote.
the deception, and the idea of his friend Lawrence, are too much for his sensibility, thought Julia; and to relieve him she addressed Charles herself.
But as Hanson, Hanson and Arthur had all signed the contracts with their own names, police were able to trace the deceptions.
Like the ancient Trojans, we have fallen for one of the oldest deceptions. Unable to breach Troy's impregnable walls, the Greeks feigned defeat and pretended to fade away.
A SPECIAL police squad in Huddersfield has captured a man wanted for a string of alleged deceptions across the UK totalling pounds 1m.
Even before the secret tapes surfaced, there were any number of ways Nixon could have been proven a liar, and when the so-called "smoking-gun" tape of the June 23, 1972, conversation with Bob Haldeman surfaced, two of his deceptions were demolished: His claim that he had not been involved in covering up anything, and his argument that he had no involvement whatsoever in implicating the CIA in the Watergate matter.
Derek Watson, 45, of Chiltern Road, North Shields, appeared in court charged with a string of deceptions dating back to 1996.
Cook's book on "artful deceptions" in nineteenth-century American popular culture is not merely fascinating, fluently written, and engaging to read.
At one point she shows up at a costume ball as Mary, Queen of Scots, offering a trussed and bejeweled fantasy of how her author might have looked if he could have escaped his Edwardian deceptions and reveled in drag for one solitary evening.
In it, he frankly and exuberantly exposed the various deceptions and "humbugs" of his early business life.