deathly

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  • adj

Synonyms for deathly

Synonyms for deathly

gruesomely suggestive of ghosts or death

causing or tending to cause death

Synonyms for deathly

having the physical appearance of death

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causing or capable of causing death

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References in periodicals archive ?
Evans, Caroline, 2003, Fashion at the Edge: Spectacle, Modernity and Deathliness, London: Yale University Press.
This requires a bold confidence (the kind that Paul exhibits) that refuses the world's deathliness and that acts with and toward the new life God gives.
Antony's ascetical regimen seems already to have produced a resurrected body in this life, one that has banished the traits of deathliness and that, by presence alone, is a conveyer of graceful, healing power.
and Deathliness. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 2003, 326 pp., hardcover.
In Baraka's work, Dada's linguistic method is appropriated into black nationalist aesthetics and deployed against the deathliness of all Western/white language and culture.
It speaks about God's will for new life working where we thought our tired deathliness would prevail."
(4) Managing to avoid compulsiveness and retrieve their own voices, they had expertise in anticipating the deathliness (and musical deadness) of obsessiveness become compulsive.
Deathliness then is the motivation for the propulsion of narrative, its very structure depends upon the shadow beneath which it must pass.
A kind of deathliness began to haunt Wordsworth early in his life, and it insists on being heard in "Laodamia," after the more pellucid streams, ampler ether, and diviner air of Elysium.
John of Patmos, repeatedly privileges exilic visions in which revelation and the hermeneutic are linked to both deathliness and the future-to-come ("And when I saw him, I fell at his feet as dead" [Rev.
The eeriness, even deathliness, we feel in mines is no matter of Earth Demons or other ancient icons of miners' superstitions.
absence," and in which the absence in representation implies the deathliness of imagination.(7) In its opening lines, in the motif of the dying hart, in the Narcissus associations of its specular imagery,(8) and in its mystical intensities ("Pause upon that, and let the breathing frame / No longer breathe, but all be satisfied" [100-1]), Home at Grasmere repeatedly makes death present in the language of poetry.
The birth of the mother, witnessed by the child, from out of the deathliness of the signifier (whether represented by the illustration of the funerary relief, or by the emptiness of the wardrobe, the "kasten," in which, through the mediation of the punning signifier, he feared she was "eingekastelt"), effectively reproduces, as a scene, the subject's birth into the world of objects by reproducing, again as a scene, the birth of the object-world itself.
This paradox lies in the perception that the experience of contemporaneity has always involved the discerning of a darkness within the sphere of the visible, a deathliness within the province of the living.
In the last of three paragraphs, despite a soaring into the work's lofty images of God-given breath, a dark new motif first enters the poem with the phrase "on my last day here." It is the theme of deathliness. Yes, the rest of the poem is death-haunted, since "here" is clearly ambiguous.