De Quincey


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Synonyms for De Quincey

English writer who described the psychological effects of addiction to opium (1785-1859)

References in periodicals archive ?
Hannah de Quincey, from Moonstruck Astronaut theatre company, and Jude Ellis from Wrekin Forest School
THOMAS DE QUINCEY'S TRANSLATIONS HAVE OFTEN BEEN REGARDED AS
In his letter to "a friend in Bengal," published in Tait's Magazine in December 1835, Thomas De Quincey warned that England was on the threshold of a "vast, rapid, and decisive" crisis, by which he referred to the ongoing social campaigns for parliamentary reform (Vol.9, 382).
GUILTY THING: A LIFE OF THOMAS DE QUINCEY BY FRANCES WILSON NEW YORK: FARRAR, STRAUS AND GIROUX.
The romantic writer most directly associated with opium was the English opium eater Thomas De Quincey.
Confessions of an English Opium-Eater is the unabridged audiobook rendition of an autobiographical work by Thomas De Quincey (1785-1859), who was prescribed the drug opium for pain relief from a chronic condition, and became an addict fascinated by his hallucinatory experiences while intoxicated.
The effects of laudanum were well described in Thomas De Quincey's classic work Confessions of an English Opium Eater.
From his 1821 Confessions of an English Opium-Eater to his later political essays on the "China Question" dating from the 1840s and 1850s to his revised and expanded Confessions of 1856, the orientalist rhetoric of Thomas De Quincey reveals a persistent vacillation between virulent John Bullism and an anxious, indeed fearful, entrancement with the Orient and its powers of possession and imaginative expansion.
One of the most notable examples comes from essayist Thomas De Quincey, author of Confessions of an English Opium-Eater and a key figure in the development of recreational drug taking in Europe and the United States.
She explores comments that writers, politicians and philosophers such as Edmund Burke, William Godwin, Mary Wollstonecraft, Adam Smith, David Hume, Dugald Stewart and John Thelwall make about crowd behaviour and sympathy but the book also substantially deals with radical print culture and writers such as William Cobbett, William Hone, Thomas de Quincey and William Hazlitt.
This essay argues that Thomas De Quincey defines 'authentic' opium habituation as the effective management of one's own personal slavery, and he uses Samuel Taylor Coleridge as a straw man to illustrate the perils of unmanaged, 'illegitimate' opium use.
Commanding Officer of QDG, Lt Colonel Jasper de Quincey Adams, said: "This homecoming is the culmination of a two-year journey from receiving our task to delivering it, from the start of our training to returning home.
His son, 12-year old Charles, is delegated to seek the help of the pixies and he is aided by the fairy poet, De Quincey , finding himself invited to a fairy feast where a powerful guest of honour, Zagabog, tells him to take the charm and get rid of it.