David Garrick


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Synonyms for David Garrick

English actor and theater manager who was the foremost Shakespearean actor of his day (1717-1779)

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References in periodicals archive ?
Unlike a Stanislavskian actor who approaches his or her role diachronically, as something that evolves moment by moment over time, early modern actors apparently approached their parts synchronically as a collection of discrete moments, at least until the advent of David Garrick who, as George Stone and George Kahrl argue, introduced a dramaturgy of character development (30-37).
EARLY IN HIS CAREER, David Garrick made two trips to Dublin.
1779: David Garrick, innovative and hugely influential English actor and theatre manager, died and was buried in Westminster Abbey.
Around the same time that Britain lost the American colonies, the nation also lost David Garrick, its leading actor, playwright, and producer.
David Garrick IN A report in the ECHO on Saturday about the death of Liverpool musician David Garrick we stated he was a dad of one.
Alongside Martin in the South Tyneside six-piece is Richard Milburn, David Garrick, Grant Lagan, Glenn Coyne and Carmen Green.
Established in 1870, it may have been named after 18th-century Shakespearean actor David Garrick or more likely the Garrick Club in London - a 19th century version of the Groucho Club in Soho.
FEAST DAY ST SEBASTIAN 1779: David Garrick, influential leading English actor and theatre manager, died: he was buried in Westminster Abbey.
In his alterations of Shakespeare for the eighteenth-century London stage, David Garrick, actor, manager, and writer, poses for Vanessa Cunningham a figure who brings into focus conflicting as well as telling cultural, artistic, and scholarly forces.
Part 3, "Eighteenth-Century Adaptation and Reception" includes Paul Yachnin, "Looking for Richard II" (121-36); Amanda Cockburn, "Awful Pomp and Endless Diversity: The Sublime Sir John Falstaff" (137-50); Gefen Bar-On Santor, "Looking for 'Newtonian' Laws in Shakespeare: The Mystifying Case of the Character of Hamlet" (151-64); Jenny Davidson, "Why Girls Look Like Their Mothers: David Garrick Rewrites The Winter's Tale" (165-80).
Thespians that performed at the theatre included noted Shakespearean actor David Garrick.
Tom Taylor did write a number of farces as did David Garrick.
His correspondents were not only other physicians but authors such as Samuel Johnson, the actor David Garrick, the painter Joshua Reynolds and many members of the ruling class, including George III's queen, Charlotte, several of whose children Hunter delivered.
More than 70 fought the fire at the former home of Shakespearean actor David Garrick.
Lethe, a very short farce by David Garrick, follows a review of actors and audience in the 1700s called Sam Butler & Co.