Daniel Hudson Burnham

(redirected from Daniel Burnham)
Also found in: Dictionary, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Graphic Thesaurus  🔍
Display ON
Animation ON
Legend
Synonym
Antonym
Related
  • noun

Synonyms for Daniel Hudson Burnham

United States architect who designed the first important skyscraper with a skeleton (1846-1912)

Synonyms

References in periodicals archive ?
Designed by Chicago architect Daniel Burnham in 1907, the century-old building was cutting-edge in its time.
However, the book fails to explain that Manila was also a city restructured thanks to Daniel Burnham and his 1905 City Beautiful plan.
As architect Daniel Burnham once said, "Make no little plans" It is only fitting that the EKU Honors Program has for twenty-three consecutive years led all its peers in the number of student presenters at the annual National Collegiate Honors Council Conference; this is what a true School of Opportunity does.
Glen Ellyn, IL, January 05, 2015 --(PR.com)-- “Make no small plans,” Daniel Burnham's philosophy, is a fitting theme for Professional Convention Management Association (PCMA) Convening Leaders.
"Or, at least, that they should go somewhere, stay put, and make their life in that place, and resolve to make it beautiful." For the past three years, Bess has been focusing his graduate urban-design studio around a project called After Burnham: The Notre Dame Plan of Chicago 2109--in part an homage to Daniel Burnham, a 19th-century urban planner and member of the parks-oriented City Beautiful movement.
But the book takes as a seminal event a 1903 plan (which involved Daniel Burnham) to clear 'slums' from the Hamilton Avenue area.
(2) In painstaking detail, Jacobs refutes the titans of city planning whose ideas dominated her era: Daniel Burnham, Lewis Mumford, Le Corbusier and Robert Moses, among others.
Not Shakespeare's, but said to be Daniel Burnham's, America's preeminent city architect-planner, the designer of the first skyscrapers after Chicago's Great Fire eviscerated four miles of downtown.
It's been more than a century since the great Chicago architect and urbanist Daniel Burnham advised, 'make no little plans, for they have no magic to stir men's blood.' Today, big plans of the architectural sort have a way of stirring the blood, but for reasons contrary to Burnham's intention: how often do we hear objections to hubristic modern projects that are too big, too expensive, too inhumane, too paternalistic and too impractical?' In our postcolonial age, architecture's Utopian impulse has been humbled by a guilty conscience and a heady dose of pragmatism.
Make No Little Plans: Daniel Burnham and the American City
The gallery is a long and narrow space with a 14-ft ceiling, and at the time of the installation it housed an exhibit of the entries in a design competition for a memorial honoring noted architect Daniel Burnham, whose design plan for Chicago has guided the city's growth over the past century.
Just like Daniel Burnham had an opportunity to create a master plan for the great city of Chicago, which to this day still benefits from his vision, we can take this time to plan carefully what the next generation of healthcare facilities will look like and to question old assumptions of where and how healthcare will even be administered.
The charming boutique hotel in which I stayed, the Burnham, was actually named in honor of the architect who conceived the building over a century ago, Daniel Burnham, the man responsible for our own Flatiron Building.
Obama, who remains overseas, described a city that grew up under architect Daniel Burnham's refrain - used a lot in the city's bid for the games - "make no small plans, they have no magic to stir the soul," and called the city a great American melting pot.