dame

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Related to Dames: games, dams, Damas
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Synonyms for dame

Synonyms for dame

informal terms for a (young) woman

a woman of refinement

References in classic literature ?
Comminges turned and saw Dame Nanette, her eyes flashing with anger and a broom in her hand.
You shall see." And Dame Nanette sprang to the window, threw it open, and in such a piercing voice that it might have been heard in the square of Notre Dame:
It was Friquet's voice; and Dame Nanette, feeling herself supported, recommenced with all her strength to sound her shrilly squawk.
SHOW producer Jane Brown genuinely believes that, sooner rather than later, there may well be nothing like a dame.
Dames & Moore/Brookhill, LLC is taking advantage of the brownfields opportunity, which involves federal regulatory provisions designed to facilitate and encourage the clean-up and redevelopment of blighted, contaminated properties.
"Christine de Pizan's Livre de la Cite des Dames: The Reconstruction of Myth," by Eleni Stecopoulos with Karl D.
"I saw Les Dawson - one of the greats - but the irony now is that I am always working at Christmas so I don't get to see other dames in action.
Amanda Glanville, of Live & Local, said: "It is the best-value Christmas show around because there's not one, but four, dames in this panto!"
The two actors met in the London headquarters of the Grand Order of Water Rats, the well-known British showbiz fraternity which has had many of the Great Dames as members since it was established 116 years ago.
Joan Plowright meets Jane Goodall, the world's foremost authority onchimpanzees,after they were both made Dames at Buckingham Palace yesterday Picture: STEFAN ROUSSEAU
Acclaimed actress Joan Plowright dubbed herself one of the three musketeers today as she became a Dame like showbiz pals 'Maggie and Judi'.
Comic dames first began to appear in pantomime in the early 19th century.