Curie point


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Synonyms for Curie point

the temperature above which a ferromagnetic substance loses its ferromagnetism and becomes paramagnetic

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References in periodicals archive ?
Wieczorek's group proposes that excess radioactivity kept the lavas within the PKT crust above the Curie point much longer than those elsewhere.
Each type of piezoelectric ceramics has its Curie point at different temperatures.
It was revealed that annealing just above the Curie point (120-130[degrees]C) caused a marked increase in crystallinity, whereas annealing in the paraelectric state (130-145[degrees]C) induced crystal growth.
It is the only pure substance with a Curie point near room temperature and exhibits a significant magnetocaloric effect over a large temperature span.
This allows the TGA temperature to be calibrated with traceable melting point standards as opposed to Curie point materials and allows DTA information to be collected along with the weight loss data.
Most ferroelectrics including BST will, when the temperature reaches the Curie point, [T.sub.c], undergo a phase transition from the ferroelectric to the paraelectric state.
16What property do some metals lose when the temperature passes their Curie point?
Formerly, TGA temperature calibrations could only be performed using time-consuming and relatively inaccurate Curie Point measurements - examining magnetic properties of certain metals while suspended in the heated furnace.
This does necessitate several requirements of the system being tested--1) the shaft material must be capable of being magnetized, 2) the shaft does not reach Curie point during operation--i.e., the temperature at which magnetic properties of a material change, 3) the shaft is not permanently bent or similarly damaged, and 4) the system is not exposed during operation to a strong magnetic field.
This does necessitate several requirements of the system being tested--l) the shaft material must be capable of being magnetized, 2) the shaft does not reach Curie point during operation--i.e., the temperature at which magnetic properties of a material change, 3) the shaft is not permanently bent or similarly damaged, and 4) the system is not exposed during operation to a strong magnetic field.
The only limitations on the system are that the shaft 1) can be magnetized (i.e., is ferrous and contains some nickel); 2) does not reach Curie point during operation (i.e., the temperature at which the magnetic properties of a material change); 3) is not damaged (for example, permanently bent); and 4) is not exposed to a strong magnetic field.
These detectors are based on the fact that ferroelectric materials, such as lithium tantalate, exhibit a large spontaneous electrical polarization below a temperature known as the Curie point. Incident radiation alters the temperature and changes the polarization.
The metal layers in an M-O disk have magnetic properties that disappear when the material is heated to an elevated temperature called the Curie point. In the first step, a laser heats a large portion of one track to the Curie point and effectively erases the track.
The metal layers in an MO disk have magnetic properties which disappear when the material is heated to an elevated temperature, called the Curie point. In the first step, a laser heats a large portion of one track to the Curie point and effectively erases the track.