crime

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Related to Crimes: grimes
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Synonyms for crime

Synonyms for crime

a serious breaking of the public law

something that offends one's sense of propriety, fairness, or justice

a great disappointment or regrettable fact

Synonyms for crime

References in classic literature ?
Deprived of power and authority, his crimes and his craft exposed, he should have appeared to them what he appeared ten years previously and one year later- an outlawed brigand.
I have always heard that truly wise men are truly good men, and have a horror of crime."
At the Bar cafe, where the reporters assembled before going to any of the courts, or to the Prefecture, in search of their news of crime, he began to win a reputation as an unraveller of intricate and obscure affairs which found its way to the office of the Chief of the Surete.
You would convict men of crime, I would convict them of innocence.
Repair your crimes toward her; let her go free, and I will exact nothing else from you."
What say you to that crime, of which I have the proof?"
"Put it to the vote!" said one of the councillors; "the crime is manifest, and it is late."
You know their doctrine; crime is a protest against the abnormality of the social organisation and nothing more, and nothing more; no other causes admitted!
Next, as to the manner in which the crime was committed.
"What shall we do now?" asked the Scarecrow, with a sigh, for such a crime had cast a gloom over all the company.
"Well," said Monte Cristo, "you may believe me if you like, but it is my opinion that a crime has been committed in this house."
No person shall be held to answer for a capital, or otherwise infamous crime, unless on a presentment or indictment of a Grand Jury, except in cases arising in the land or naval forces, or in the Militia, when in actual service in time of War or public danger; nor shall any person be subject for the same offense to be twice put in jeopardy of life or limb; nor shall be compelled in any criminal case to be a witness against himself, nor be deprived of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law; nor shall private property be taken for public use without just compensation.
It is the other part of your offence, therefore, upon which I intend to admonish you, I mean the violation of your chastity;--a crime, however lightly it may be treated by debauched persons, very heinous in itself, and very dreadful in its consequences.
In order to prevent this dreadful calamity they both set about inventing some plan which would throw suspicion on some one else, and at last they made up their minds that they could do no better than select a Jewish doctor who lived close by as the author of the crime. So the tailor picked up the hunchback by his head while his wife took his feet and carried him to the doctor's house.
The next paragraph asserted that the said Eustace Macallan, taken before John Daviot, Esquire, advocate, Sheriff-Substitute of Mid-Lothian, did in his presence at Edinburgh (on a given date, viz., the 29th of October), subscribe a Declaration stating his innocence of the alleged crime: this Declaration being reserved in the Indictment--together with certain documents, papers and articles, enumerated in an Inventory--to be used in evidence against the prisoner.
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