courante

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Words related to courante

a court dance of the 16th century

References in periodicals archive ?
132) while the Hartford Corant dubbed them "political tramps.
The lighter dances too, in which the theorbos revert to a continuo role, come richly to life in performance as the presence of four bass instruments lends a lovely warmth to the music and allows Lawes to indulge his fondness for tone clusters, as in the closing moments of the Corant from the same Suite in D.
The primary pulse of the music is 3/4 but an occasional 6/8 crops up, much as in contemporaneous corants (although this piece is entitled "Jigg").
More importantly, he gave spaciousness and weight to these suites of airs--mainly almaines, corants and sarabands, with the occasional grave pavan and jig-like `morrisse'--by adding new pieces: two delightful echo movements in which one violin and bass viol answer the rest of the ensemble, a spatial effect of a kind chiefly associated in England with court masques; a remarkable C major pavan, with divisions on each strain involving all three pairs of instruments (albeit with some rather unidiomatic double stopping for violin in the final division); and, crowning all, two splendid fantasias (one in D minor, one in D major) in which there is real independent contrapuntal writing for all six instruments and various groupings possible within the ensemble are contrasted with one another.
More importantly, he gave spaciousness and weight to these suites of airs--mainly almaines, corants and sarabands, with the occasional grave pavan and jig-like `morrisse' by adding new pieces: two delightful echo movements in which one violin and bass viol answer the rest of the ensemble, a spatial effect of a kind chiefly associated in England with court masques; a remarkable C major pavan, with divisions on each strain involving all three pairs of instruments (albeit with some rather unidiomatic double stopping for violin in the final division); and, crowning all, two splendid fantasias (one in D minor, one in D major) in which there is real independent contrapuntal writing for all six instruments and various groupings possible within the ensemble are contrasted with one another.