deficiency

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Synonyms for deficiency

Synonyms for deficiency

Synonyms for deficiency

References in periodicals archive ?
The goat was coming from a farm where laryngeal paralysis due to severe copper deficiency outbreak was previously reported.
The typical neuropathy seen with zinc toxicity and subsequent copper deficiency is axonal in nature, affecting sensory more than motor fibers and lower extremities more than upper extremities.
In reality, those animals can't tolerate the levels of copper needed by deer; thus, giving sheep/goat feed to whitetails can create a copper deficiency.
According to Engle and Spears (2001), copper deficiency causes an increase in plasma cholesterol.
Management of copper poisoning is based on the justification that overload molybdenum may cause copper deficiency and molybdenum in concurrence with the sulfate ion has been used in treating copper poisoning in ruminants (Pierson and Aenes, 1958).
87 indicate that copper deficiency is not associated with parturient haemoglobinuria which is contrary to the previously reported results of Digraskar et al.
Our findings, plus information from the literature, suggest that copper deficiency could predispose people to develop myopia," Young said.
Copper deficiency impairs the formation of connective tissue proteins, collagen, and elastin.
Too much zinc, say more than 200 mg a day, is associated with dizziness and fatigue, and may interfere with the absorption of copper, causing a copper deficiency that may contribute to impaired brain function.
A copper deficiency was detected in Exmoor Ranger last season and with that sorted out he proved a different proposition on his reappearane at Ascot in October.
The patient was diagnosed with copper deficiency myeloneuropathy due to zinc toxicity from his denture adhesive.
In human adults, severe copper deficiency is relatively rare, whereas signs of moderate copper deficiency were observed in human infants under a variety of conditions [12].
Copper deficiency results in anemia and congenital inability to excrete copper resulting in Wilson's disease (Gupta, 1975).
The studies reveal that there is no correlation between the copper deficiency and the physical exercise taken (M.
Indications of copper deficiency in a subpopulation of Alaskan moose.