medicine

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Synonyms for medicine

Synonyms for medicine

an agent used to restore health

a substance used in the treatment of disease

Synonyms for medicine

the branches of medical science that deal with nonsurgical techniques

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(medicine) something that treats or prevents or alleviates the symptoms of disease

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punishment for one's actions

treat medicinally, treat with medicine

References in periodicals archive ?
To avoid falling victim to cookbook medicine, the authors propose a stepwise strategy for patients--'the 8 pillars to better diagnosis' This strategy advocates patients to become more involved in the management of their health, and when visiting doctors, in the making of their diagnoses.
David Sackett (1996), for instance, a strong supporter of EBM, asserts that properly applied EBM is not cookbook medicine. He says, "it requires a bottom-up approach that integrates the best external evidence with individual clinical expertise and patient choice, and cannot result in slavish, cookbook approaches to individual patient care." He and other supporters believe that EBM can encourage more patient-focused care by making explicit the pros and cons among "acceptable treatment options" from which the patient and their clinician may then choose.
Although it strives for sequential logic and completeness of therapeutic options, the algorithm isn't meant to be used as "cookbook medicine," Dr.
Although derided in the medical community as "cookbook medicine," clinical practice guidelines give providers standards for the treatment of common illnesses, particularly in the area of chronic disease management.
A series of reports from 1989 (12, 13) and subsequently have labeled practice guidelines as "cookbook medicine".
Even more than in the past, they are encouraged to practice the kind of cookbook medicine Lown deplores.
Medical students and residents are warned of the dangers of Cookbook Medicine -- blindly following protocols without analyzing the problem and instituting tests and treatments based upon careful study of the facts.
However, physicians have historically been suspicious of comparative effectiveness--terming it "cookbook medicine" or "the practice of medicine by strict adherence to practice guidelines, which may not be an appropriate substitute for clinical judgement." (30)
Some physicians are wary of EBM as "cookbook medicine" that may restrict their autonomy and curtail their discretion in treating unique patients.
But Sean Tipton, a spokesman for the American Society for Reproductive Medicine, calls that change "an exercise in cookbook medicine," because it undermines the discretion of the clinician.
The physician retains autonomy over the encounter and the patient is not troubled by what he or she may believe is cookbook medicine.