coca

(redirected from Coca leaves)
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Synonyms for coca

a South American shrub whose leaves are chewed by natives of the Andes

United States comedienne who starred in early television shows with Sid Caesar (1908-2001)

Synonyms

dried leaves of the coca plant (and related plants that also contain cocaine)

References in periodicals archive ?
a) the Government of Colombia holds the chewing of coca leaf to be harmful; b) There is a close but not exclusive relationship between diet and chewing; for the moment, it causes extreme nutritional deficiency; c) the total removal of the coca is an economic struggle because the owners (landlords) pay much of the wages of their laborers in coca leaves.
During our stint in South America, the United States, with its vast resources, tried to curtail the supply of coca leaves at the source by funding the local governments to destroy coca crops.
It was tough, but our guide explained to me and my friend that coca leaves, if you chew on them, are very good for acclimatising to altitude.
Coca leaves have been an important part of "Boliviafn culture] since pre-Incaic times.
Annually, approximately 75 thousand tons of coca leaves are used to produce various medicinal tinctures.
Cocaine comes from coca leaves grown in countries like Colombia, Peru and Bolivia.
For example, Allen noted that the soft drink once contained trace amounts of cocaine as a result of the coca leaves in the ingredients, as well as four times the amount of caffeine.
CT scans of the girl's body exposed a mass of coca leaves tucked into her cheek (inset), an international team reports July 29 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
As a "gesture of goodwill" he offered us a free sample of their drugs - made from coca leaves grown on the lower slopes of the Andes - to prove their quality.
He eats what can hunt, like snake, lizard and fox, only drinks mountain spring water, chews coca leaves, avoids sugar and says that he has never been seriously ill.
While Kate ponders whether this age-old traditional way of life has a future, she enjoys the colourful everyday life that includes treats such as coca leaves and roast guinea pig.
Although Coca-Cola no longer contains cocaine, the company still uses an extract of coca leaves in its beloved soft drink.
Ch'ama creator Victor Escobar says the ancient residents of the area (the 'Indians') used to chew coca leaves to protect themselves against altitude sickness, which is locally known as soroche and can be quite disconcerting.
If the world supply of coca leaves significantly increased, the mechanics of the trade might change, but the cocaine industry would most likely boom.
If this was true, hundreds of thousands of indigenous people chewing coca leaves on a daily basis would have died from overdoses.