Ciardi


Also found in: Dictionary, Wikipedia.
Graphic Thesaurus  🔍
Display ON
Animation ON
Legend
Synonym
Antonym
Related
  • noun

Synonyms for Ciardi

United States poet and critic (1916-1986)

References in periodicals archive ?
And in 1961, John Ciardi claims responsibility for practicing an art form that already contains the seeds of defeat: 'Any theoretical remarks offered by a translator are bound to be an apology for his failures.
When Ciardi claims that one part of the poem "may urge itself much more rapidly or more slowly than another," he is suggesting not just that pace changes throughout the poem, and is therefore relative, but also that the poem itself indicates its pacing.
She said, "Paul Ingram is to clerihews what John Ciardi is to limericks."
Two earlier books were also selected for awards: Mechanical Fireflies won the Barrow Street Press Book Prize, and Black Tupelo Country, the John Ciardi Prize.
The 1954 John Ciardi translation, still readily available today, renders the line as "Then fasting overcame my grief and me," followed by the comment "i.e., He died." Some interpret the line to mean that Ugolino's hunger drove him to cannibalism but the fact is that cannibalism is the one major sin Dante does not assign a place to in Hell.
John Ciardi's venerable, popular version is highly readable, and his notes are matchless.
The process began under the leadership of retired School Superintendent Gregory Ciardi, whom Mr.
Ciardi, 30-77; Liana De Girolami Cheney, The Homes of Giorgio Vasari; and Liana De Girolami Cheney, Le Dimore di Giorgio Vasari.
Airs & Voices, a Ciardi Prize book from BkMk Press, and
"Not quite graphable" is how John Ciardi described patients in a wonderful poem titled "Lines From the Beating End of the Stethoscope." In that poem, which he read at the inaugural for the new president of New York Medical College, he describes medicine, as the title suggests, from the patient's point of view.
"Not quite graphable" is how John Ciardi described patients in a wonderful poem, "'Lines From the Beating End of the Stethoscope." In the poem, which he read at the inaugural for the new president of New York Medical College, he describes medicine from the patient's point of view.
Despite this softening of tone, it's tempting to suppose that the reason Ammons's subsequent selections tilt even further toward "academic poets" like Nemerov, Daniel Hoffman, and John Ciardi, was to defy Levertov's criticism.
Holmberg's second book of poems, "Axis Mundi," won the John Ciardi Prize.
Winner of the John Ciardi Prize for Poetry, Sacred Wounds is a collection that will prove its worth on the shelves of dedicated readers of poetry, as well as on those of public libraries.
Ciardi's monograph on Figino is a valuable source for biographic details.