establishment

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Synonyms for establishment

the Establishment

Synonyms

  • the authorities
  • the system
  • the powers that be
  • the ruling class
  • the established order
  • institutionalized authority

Synonyms for establishment

Synonyms for establishment

a public or private structure (business or governmental or educational) including buildings and equipment for business or residence

any large organization

(ecology) the process by which a plant or animal becomes established in a new habitat

the cognitive process of establishing a valid proof

Synonyms

References in periodicals archive ?
A church establishment is, in essence, equivalent to the adoption of a paternalistic attitude on the part of the state in the matter of the philosophical worldview chosen by its citizens.
In a recent study, I have demonstrated some ways in which a church establishment should be interpreted, especially in a country that is a member state of the European Union, so that this interpretation does not violate religious equality.
The British model of the established church is not entirely congruous with the international law on human rights (although the author contends otherwise) for the following reasons: (a) the interpretation of the church establishment generates discrimination against free churches, because it recognizes that the economic and social privileges accorded to the former do not extend to the latter; and (b) the collective dimension of religious freedom in the United Kingdom is insufficiently protected.
Situation Following Benedict's Resignation: The historic, humble but courageous act of resignation of Pope Benedict XVI sent shock waves throughout the church establishments and power structures.
The church establishments from the Holy Places, to which the Romanian monasteries were sacred, had the duty to watch their existence and maintenance, fulfilling all the obligations stipulated by their founders: maintenance of hospitals or asylums, schools, granting charities, so on, and for fulfilling all these requirements, they should have received a part of monastery incomes.
Taken from a conference 900 years after the synod at University College Cork and Cashel, the subjects include Canterbury's perspective on church reform and Ireland, Cork and Waterford as gateways to southern Ireland, the career of Muirchertach Ua Brian and his patronage of Saint Flannan's oratory at Killaloe, women and marriage in late pre-Norman Ireland, the question of whether Irish church establishments were under lay control, literary manifestations of twelfth-century reform, the construction and decoration of Cormac's chapel at Cashel, evidence of discourse between Germany and Cashel, the role of bishops in liturgy and reform, the portrayal of the Irish in Bernard's Life of Malachy, and Romanesque scholarship.
After the revolution, they pressed their opposition to the official church establishments and their support for separation of church and state.
Amicus secretary Chris Ball said: 'The senior figures from the faith and the church establishments are likely to oppose giving clergy employment rights, just like McDonald's and Burger King might be against an increase in the national minimum wage.
Under the aegis of church establishments, Baptists, Methodists and others had been horsewhipped, jailed even tarred and feathered for preaching without a license, which they refused to request, from states.
Roxborogh's book fills this gap, presenting a convincing portrait of Chalmers as an evangelical pragmatist whose attitudes on most of the contested questions of the day--from church establishments to the place of "civilization" in mission--were shaped by the priority of bringing Christ to the people of Scotland and to humanity at large.
Differences over these matters, it is argued, introduced structural tensions within the church establishments, which ultimately did as much or more to undermine the confessional states than did external opposition in the form of heterodox dissent or enlightened critique.
Such convergences meant that the dissenters often had more in common across the confessional divides than they did with opponents within their own church establishments.
He says: "Bamburgh was clearly an important medieval settlement, with a port and three church establishments.