Chiricahua Apache


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Related to Chiricahua Apache: Cochise, Geronimo, Chiricahua National Monument
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Words related to Chiricahua Apache

an Apache language

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From nomadic Paleo-Indians 10,000 years ago to Chiricahua Apache raiders who arrived about the same time as the Spaniards, the land has long been settled.
This may be a rare chance to document how the Chiricahua Apaches lived.
Author Sweeney is an independent scholar who has written other books on Cochise and the Chiricahua Apaches.
He was born in 1914 to Sam and Blossom Haozous, who were among a group of Chiricahua Apaches held as prisoners of war for 27 years after Geronimo surrendered to U.
Cloud began his successful campaign to release the Chiricahua Apaches from Fort Sill in 1908, while still an undergraduate at Yale University and in his early twenties.
But the ruins also commemorate the Chiricahua Apache Indian.
Although the Mohonk Lodge is perhaps best known to readers of this magazine for the marketing of Southern Plains style beaded moccasins sourced locally from Cheyenne and Arapaho makers, it is known that beadwork was also acquired from the Chiricahua Apaches at Fort Sill, Oklahoma, as well as from other Apache reservations in the American Southwest.
Geronimo was born in the 1820s among the Chiricahua Apache in what was then Mexico and named One Who Yawns.
Nachomee Naiche Ray, great-granddaughter of Cochise, the legendary leader of the Chiricahua Apache, is from the San Carlos Reservation in Arizona.
The American President and the Chiricahua Apache medicine man, though, had more than their celebrity in common.
Had the book ended with Chiricahua Apache Franciscan Sister Juanita Little's words, "You can be Indian and you can be Catholic" (p.
It was a historical fact of life at that time the film tales place at the end of a couple of hundred years of European Anglo conquest of the indigenous people and the Chiricahua Apache people of that region were the very last hold outs.
Old-timers still recall stories of Geronimo, the legendary Chiricahua Apache war chief for whom the trail was named.
Proud of his heritage, the younger Garcia, a Chiricahua Apache, often was known by his Indian name of Lone Wolf.
Howard as his personal representative to negotiate peace treaties, and Howard had some success with Cochise's Chiricahua Apache, assigning them to a mountainous reservation near the Mexican border.