miracle play

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Related to Chester Plays: Towneley Plays, York Plays
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Words related to miracle play

a medieval play representing episodes from the life of a saint or martyr

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In the Chester plays, for instance, after the initial pledge to contribute towards its construction when she offers to bring some timber:
4) The quotations from the Chester plays will be taken from Lumiansky and Mills' edition (1986) and numbers of the lines refer to this edition.
40) Research has shown the surviving texts to have been the result of extensive revision and addition in the first half of the sixteenth century, and, since the cycle continued to be performed until 1575, one author was prompted to describe the extant Chester plays as a Tudor cycle.
After all, it has long been recognized that the Chester plays contain borrowings from other medieval texts and mystery plays elsewhere.
113-15, for the inclusion of material from the Middle-English poem A Stanzaic Life of Christ in at least seven Chester plays, and also borrowings from the Coventry, Towneley, and York cycles and the Brome play.
The best current authority on the Chester plays, David Mills, has recently described in detail, in Recycling the Cycle.
In this paper I sketch out and to explore further some of those circumstances surrounding the last performance of the Chester plays, proposing that during the course of the late sixteenth century the town's civic identity changed in more drastic ways than have been appreciated before, and that the fate of play performances there represents a story with darker significance, one about social forces bent on policing the lives of citizens.
Rather than focusing on the Chester plays as significant phenomena in themselves, Mills places them within the physical city and its political and ceremonial concerns.
For scholars of the drama, perhaps Mills' most significant contribution is his account of the Puritan opposition to the last performances of the Chester plays.
Apart from the chance to compete in internal club tournaments, Chester plays in the North West Federation League against some of the 13 other clubs in the region.
The angelA scene from one of the Mystery Plays showing the has a sprig of laurel in her right hand and the Book of Knowledge in her left' The Last Supper in a Chester play from the mid-60s' The devil tempts Eve with an apple in the Garden of Eden
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