Cerastes cornutus

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Related to Cerastes cerastes: Horned vipers
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Synonyms for Cerastes cornutus

highly venomous viper of northern Africa and southwestern Asia having a horny spine above each eye

References in periodicals archive ?
A previously healthy 23-year-old lady in her 37th week of pregnancy (G1P0A0) was bitten in her left leg by a snake that was later identified as the horned viper Cerastes cerastes. She developed pain and blisters at the site of the bite.
Warrell, "Life-threatening envenoming by the Saharan horned viper (Cerastes cerastes) causing micro-angiopathic haemolysis, coagulopathy and acute renal failure: clinical cases and review," QJM, vol.
El Jaoudi, "Acute renal failure following the Saharan horned viper (Cerastes cerastes) bite," Arab Journal of Nephrology and Transplantation, vol.
Svitek, "Acute pancreatitis after viperid snake cerastes cerastes envenoming: a case report," Prague Medical Report, vol.
Life-threatening envenoming by the Saharan horned viper (Cerastes cerastes) causing micro-angiopathic haemolysis coagulopathy and acute renal failure: clinical cases and review.
Life-threatening envenoming by the Saharan horned viper (Cerastes cerastes) causing microangiopathic haemolysis, coagulopathy and acute renal failure: clinical cases and review.
The greater horned viper (Cerastes cerastes) lives in all the Saharo-Sindian deserts.
Abdel Nabi (1993) has reported that a sub-lethal dose of both crude viper Cerastes cerastes venom and its B fraction showed a significant rise in blood urea nitrogen and this was parallel to a significant increase in serum creatinine levels as well.
As they mentioned that grave renal complications in case of Naja haje and Cerastes cerastes envenomation escort to impairment of the excretory function of the kidney.
Effect of crude Cerastes cerastes venom and fraction B on the clinical parameters of white rat.
Cytopathological effect of Cerastes cerastes (Egyptian sand viper) venom and its hemorrhagic toxin on liver and kidney.
Nowadays, the term asp is applied to both the Egyptian cobra (Naja haje) and the Saharan horned viper (Cerastes cerastes).