centipede

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chiefly nocturnal predacious arthropod having a flattened body of 15 to 173 segments each with a pair of legs, the foremost pair being modified as prehensors

References in classic literature ?
"I swan naow, ef it ain't the old Ark itself!" mimicked the Centipede from the deck of the Ghost.
The Centipede and the Porpoise doubled up on the cabin in paroxysms of laughter, and left us to get clear as best we could.
Then the Centipede's brutal face appeared in the companionway, and he descended into the cabin, followed by the Porpoise.
"Didn't I see you on the dock in Oakland the other day?" the Centipede asked suddenly of me.
But the Centipede, the Porpoise, Barchi, and Skilling took the lead, and followed by the rest of us, at least thirty men in half as many boats, rowed right up to the watchmen.
We heard cries for help, in the unmistakable voice of the Centipede, and this time, on rowing closer, we were not fired upon.
The Centipede was the first to be pulled aboard, and he came willingly, though he objected when the constable put the handcuffs on him.
"You didn't get the Porpoise," the Centipede said exultantly, as though his escape materially diminished our success.
"I know what a centipede is; they've got lots of legs.
Although the word "centipede" means "hundred feet," centipedes actually have between 15 and 177 pairs of legs.
Some also add other insects, including centipedes and earthworms, to concoct their own soju health tonics.
For example regional keys to the centipedes of the north-central United States clearly present S.
Presented by publishers America Star Books without editorial input, "Centipede Lovers" is a mini novel, or story about two gay centipede friends from Jerusalem who dream of living as openly gay centipedes in New York City.
Years passed and Beccaloni, together with his colleague Gregory Edgecombe and his Thai student Warut Siriwut, ventured on a wild expedition to hunt for new species of centipede. The trio acquired two centipedes near a waterfall in Laos and they were named Scolopendra cataracta, derived from the Latin term for 'waterfall.' The centipede's venom is not deadly, but it can penetrate the human skin and smolder a lengthy portion of it for days.