war

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Synonyms for war

Synonyms for war

Synonyms for war

References in periodicals archive ?
Toward that end, consider the causes of war and those of peace, presented side by side in the chart below.
Consequently, Lebow posits that understanding the causes of war begins with the exploration of the decisionmaking motives and then the foreign policy goals that they engender.
It is not usual to consider the causes of war in the time and place dealt with in this book as "religious.
And instead of hating the people you think are warmongers, hate the appetite and disorder in your own soul, which are also causes of war.
In other words, as the Dutch social scientist Henk Houweling puts it, "one of the causes of war is war itself.
War and Punishment: The Causes of War Termination and the First World War.
The first is to present a set of five hypotheses on the causes of war grounded in "misperceptive fine-grained structural realism" (p.
The question of why a weaker state would attack a stronger adversary is important because it appears to undermine some of the core assumptions and central hypotheses associated with conventional understandings of the causes of war.
13), while John Rich rehabilitates the |fear of powerful neighbours' and the |irrational fear' of not-so-powerful neighbours as causes of war (II: pp.
ultimate" causes of war that influence the goals people fight for, such as competition within a society for scarce resources or mates, and intense divisions between groups of related men.
The second part is focused on the causes of war and militarized disputes, with chapters devoted to contiguity and territory, power, alliances, and other related subjects.
He argues that the different causes of war explain their variation in duration and severity, drawing on the bargaining model of war to examine three casual mechanisms that bring about violent conflict: divergent expectations and mutual overoptimism, principal-agent problems in domestic policies, and commitment problems that generate an inability to trust one's opponent to live up to a political agreement.
READER Herschel of Gosforth expounded his views on the causes of war and his lack of support for those in the care of the British Legion who still need our support aided by the sale of poppies in our annual tributes to the fallen of two world wars.